Monday, November 12, 2012

Published:

Petraeus shocked that girlfriend allegedly threatened another woman in emails, AP is told

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) -- CIA Director David Petraeus was shocked to learn last summer that his mistress was suspected of sending threatening emails warning another woman to stay away from him, former staff members and friends told The Associated Press Monday.

Petraeus told these associates his relationship with the second woman, Tampa socialite Jill Kelley, was platonic, though his biographer-turned-lover Paula Broadwell apparently saw her as a romantic rival. Retired Gen. Petraeus also denied to these associates that he had given Broadwell any of the sensitive military information alleged to have been found on her computer, saying anything she had must have been provided by other commanders during reporting trips to Afghanistan.

The associates spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to publicly discuss the matters, which could be part of an FBI investigation.

Meanwhile, FBI agents appeared at Broadwell's Charlotte, N.C., home Monday night and appeared to be conducting a search. An FBI spokeswoman confirmed the agents' presence but did not say what they were doing.

Petraeus, who led U.S. military efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan, resigned his CIA post Friday, acknowledging his extramarital affair with Broadwell and expressing deep regret.

___

Timeline of Petraeus' fall from grace: How and when affair and FBI investigation unfolded

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The extramarital affair that brought down David Petraeus' celebrated career last week raised many questions. Among them: when exactly the affair began, how the FBI stumbled upon the information and who was told about it. Here's a timeline of events, according to officials involved in the investigation:

___

Spring 2006 -- Paula Broadwell meets Petraeus at Harvard University where she is a graduate student. Petraeus is a lieutenant general working on a manual about counterinsurgency and is invited to give a speech about his experiences in Iraq.

January 2007 -- The Senate confirms Petraeus as the commanding general for U.S. troops in Iraq.

2008 -- Broadwell initiates a case study of Petraeus' leadership. On a visit to Washington, Petraeus invites Broadwell to join him and his team for a run along the Potomac River.

___

10 Things to Know for Tuesday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about on Tuesday:

1. WHAT PETRAEUS THOUGHT OF THREATENING EMAILS

Friends say the then-CIA director was shocked when he learned his mistress was warning another woman to stay away from him.

___

Israeli military scores 'direct hits' on Syrian artillery launcher in first open clash

TEL HAZEKA, Golan Heights (AP) -- Israeli tanks struck a Syrian artillery launcher Monday after a stray mortar shell flew into Israel-held territory, the first direct clash between the neighbors since the Syrian uprising began nearly two years ago.

The confrontation fueled new fears that the Syrian civil war could drag Israel into the violence, a scenario with grave consequences for the region. The fighting has already spilled into Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey.

"We are closely monitoring what is happening and will respond appropriately. We will not allow our borders to be violated or our citizens to be fired upon," Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday in a speech to foreign ambassadors.

While officials believe President Bashar Assad has no interest in picking a fight with Israel, they fear the embattled Syrian leader may try to draw Israel into the fighting in a bout of desperation. Israeli officials believe it is only a matter of time before Syrian rebels topple the longtime leader.

The conflict has already spilled over into several of Syria's other neighbors -- whether in direct violence or in the flood of refugees fleeing the bloodshed. More than 36,000 Syrians have been killed in the fighting, according to estimates by anti-Assad activists.

___

Investigation into blast that devastated Indianapolis neighborhood focusing on natural gas

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -- The search for what caused a massive, deadly explosion that rocked an Indianapolis neighborhood turned to natural gas Monday, with officials checking gas lines and a homeowner saying a problem furnace could be to blame.

The National Transportation Safety Board sent investigators to check gas main and other lines serving the neighborhood where two people were killed and seven injured in the weekend blast. Local gas supplier Citizens Energy said it also was checking gas lines and a meter at the home that exploded.

But officials cautioned that it was too soon to rule out other causes, saying only that they do not believe a meth lab was to blame for the explosion that obliterated two homes and severely damaged dozens of others.

"It's too early to speculate that this might have been caused by a gas leak," Citizens Energy spokeswoman Sarah Holsapple said at an afternoon news briefing.

The owner of one of the homes that was destroyed said there was a problem with the furnace in the last few weeks.

___

Belize police seek founder of McAfee software to question him in murder of US citizen neighbor

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- Police in the Central American nation of Belize said Monday that they are looking for the founder of the software company McAfee Inc. to question him about the slaying of another U.S. citizen, his neighbor in an island town on the Caribbean.

John McAfee lived next door to 52-year-old Gregory Viant Faull, who was found with a gunshot wound to his head inside his two-story home north of San Pedro, a town on the island of Ambergris Caye, said Raphael Martinez, spokesman for Belize's Ministry of National Security. The housekeeper discovered the body Sunday morning and called police.

Martinez said that no charges had been filed in the case, describing McAfee, 67, only as a "person of interest" for police.

"It's too early in the investigation. To say he is a suspect would be a bold statement," Martinez told The Associated Press.

Police officers went to McAfee's home on the island but he had not been there, the spokesman said.

___

2 weeks after Superstorm Sandy, nearly 60,000 Long Island customers still without power

HICKSVILLE, N.Y. (AP) -- Two weeks after Superstorm Sandy, while most utilities have restored electricity to nearly all their customers, there was one glaring exception Monday: a Long Island power company with more outages -- almost 60,000 Monday -- than all the others combined.

As people on Long Island fumed over the cold and the darkness and complained that they couldn't get answers from the company, the Long Island Power Authority said in its defense that the storm was worse than anyone could have imagined and that it didn't just damage outdoor electrical lines; it caused flooding that touched home and business breaker boxes.

LIPA also acknowledged that an outdated computer system for keeping customers notified has added to people's frustration.

But some say the government-run utility should have seen it coming. It was recently criticized in a withering state report for lax preparation ahead of last year's Hurricane Irene and for the 25-year-old computer system used to pinpoint outages and update customers.

"It's antiquated. I think they're negligent," said Phil Glickman, a retired Wall Street executive from South Bellmore who waited 11 days to get electricity back.

___

More women have driver's licenses than men, reversing a long-time gender gap on US roads

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Women have passed men on the nation's roads. More women than men now have driver's licenses, a reversal of a longtime gender gap behind the wheel that transportation researchers say is likely to have safety and economic implications.

If current trends continue, the gap will only widen. The share of teens and young adults of both sexes with driver's licenses is declining, but the decline is greater for young men, according to a study by the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute. The study looked at gender trends in driver's licenses between 1995 and 2010.

"The changing gender demographics will have major implications on the extent and nature of vehicle demand, energy consumption, and road safety," predicted Michael Sivak, co-author of the study. Women are more likely than men to purchase smaller, safer and more fuel-efficient cars; to drive less, and to have a lower fatality rate per distance driven, he said.

Over the 15 years the study covered, the share of men ages 25 to 29 years old with driver's licenses dropped 10.6 percent. The share of women of the same age with driver's licenses declined by about half that amount, 4.7 percent.

Male drivers outnumbered women drivers from the moment the first Ford Model T rolled off the assembly line in 1908, the year the automobile became popular, and through most of the last century. In the 1950s, when only about half of adult women had driver's licenses, jokes about women drivers were a staple of comedians.

___

Tulsa dad facing neglect charge after toddler found in cage, girl naked outside on cold day

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- A Tulsa man was arrested after police found his 18-month-old daughter locked in a metal dog cage, his naked 4-year old daughter outside on a cold afternoon and him asleep in a drug or alcohol "induced stupor," police said Monday.

A neighbor called police after finding the older child outside the family's home and getting no response when he knocked on the door around 4 p.m. Sunday, as temperatures dropped to the low 40s. Officers' knocks also went unanswered, "then one of the officers looked inside and saw a small child in a dog cage," Tulsa police spokesman Officer Leland Ashley said.

After forcing their way inside, police discovered the toddler was covered in feces and that a 3-year-old child was asleep in another room. Their father was found asleep on a bed, "in an alcohol- or narcotics-induced stupor," Ashley said.

The three children were placed into the custody of the Department of Human Services, and the father was arrested on a child neglect complaint. The Associated Press is not naming the father so to protect the identity of the children, who showed no sign of physical injury, Ashley said.

Their mother had been at work and arrived as officers were preparing to leave the scene. She was not arrested and her name was not released, Ashley said.

___

3 quarterbacks concussed on 1 hard-hitting Sunday; NFL says teams handled injuries properly

Next week's big, nationally televised "Monday Night Football" showcase could feature a quarterback matchup of journeyman Jason Campbell of the Bears vs. untested Colin Kaepernick of the 49ers. Not exactly the creme de la creme of the NFC.

Why? Concussions, of course.

With so much attention paid to replacement refs and bounty ruling appeals this season, it's an issue that's slipped a bit under the radar lately. But it's hard to ignore this: 25 percent of Sunday's NFL games saw a starting QB leave with a concussion.

Two were Chicago's Jay Cutler and San Francisco's Alex Smith, whose teams play each other next Monday. Both stayed in Sunday's games for several plays after what appeared to be head-rattling hits. Smith even threw a TD pass while playing with blurred vision before he departed, according to coach Jim Harbaugh.

"It's a reminder that you've got to err on the side of caution," said Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, co-chairman of the NFL's head, neck and spine committee, who was not familiar with the particulars of Sunday's quarterback injuries. "The question that I would ask is: Why did Mr. Smith not report this to his team physician, and say, 'Hey, I've got blurred vision, is that a problem?' ... We have to educate the medical teams to be really conservative. And we still have to educate players to self-report. If they don't feel 100 percent, they have to be willing to very strongly tell somebody."