3 arrested with heroin trafficking in Franklin County

Drugs allegedly found at Centennial Drive apartment

State Journal staff report, Published:

Three people are in Franklin County Regional Jail after sheriff’s deputies arrested them Thursday on heroin charges.

Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton said the heroin seized from a Centennial Drive apartment would have been enough to supply about 90 people with a bindle — a tenth of a gram — each. Melton said a bindle sells for about $30, making the heroin worth nearly $2,800.

“It’s a significant amount,” Melton said.

Deputies arrested Paul Jackson, 28, and Cedric Winters, 35, both of Detroit, and Heather Burton, 25, of Frankfort.

All three are charged with trafficking in more than 2 grams of heroin and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Melton said the apartment, 206 Centennial Drive, No. 2, had been under surveillance as a part of an ongoing investigation.

When Jackson and Burton got into a rented 2013 Ford Explorer and drove away, deputies stopped them, Melton said.

The SUV had several bullet holes and accident damage to the right front side, Melton said. Jackson told deputies he was shot in the shoulder and the vehicle was damaged during an incident in Detroit, but he wouldn’t go into detail about it, Melton said.

Jackson and Burton were arrested at the scene.

“Mr. Jackson is one of the major heroin dealers,” Melton said. “He’s one of the upper level heroin dealers in our community.”

A search warrant was executed for the apartment, where deputies recovered the heroin and several hundred dollars in cash, Melton said. Winters was arrested at the apartment.

Jackson is also charged with possession of marijuana and Xanax and was served a bench warrant for failure to appear in court.

Burton is also charged with operating on a suspended license.

“What makes it so important is we had between eight and 10 overdoses last year … it’s killing our people,” Melton said of the growing heroin problem in Franklin County.

“Franklin County is a better place today because of the work done by the sheriff’s deputies.”

All three are lodged in Franklin County Regional Jail. Jackson is held on a $20,300 bond, Winters is held on a $10,200 bond and Burton is held on a $10,400 bond.

All three are scheduled to appear in court Monday.

Want to leave your comments?

Sign in or Register to comment.

  • I know what you mean bodeen about the way cops approach citizens today. A few months back, guess the cop was in training, I got pull over because of my left rear signal wasn't working, blown bulb. In that I found out that two of the three brake lights were blown too. As I sat waiting for the new cop to approach my side when out of the corner of my eye I see the training cop sneak his way up the passenger side of my truck. I started laughing and told the cop at my window to tell his buddy to stand down before someone gets hurt. That took the new cop back a bit and his reply was, "that's how we roll" and I busted out laughing again.

    It's that kind of un checked attitude is why people do not trust the cops in this town. I'm just wondering whatever happend to respect and manners from law enforcement to the very citizens that pay their salaries has gone? Is it treatment same for all, or is it situational, or type of vehicle? And then you have to wonder even futher in that thought and compare the attitudes of State Troopers to our city police force. Big difference between the two departments for sure.

  • Pitch, glad you wre able to beat your demon and realize that it isn't worth the trouble. It certainly takes the will before is able to quit. Prisons for sure doens't work and rehab will only work if the person actually wants to get help off drugs but they are the ones that are able to coax that will along if the person needs a little shove. I am a firm believer in 12 step and AA. Prisons are costly just to suspend ones habit for a little while so why even do it when they will go back to drugs the day they get out. Who is really getting punished. It starts from home I have looked at this from all sides. I am not afraid to try something different even if it means legalizing and treat users the same as alcohol. Hold them responsible if they let it cause others problems. People were killed and being blinded during prohibition due to unsafe alcohol and I would suspect drugs like heroin would be made safer and cheaper if the criminal element was removed..

    I will repeat, I know most drugs are bad and dangerous and nobody should ever start but I can honestly see why one will. I will also repeat that until the government is willing to punish all equally and fairly based on the crime committed instead of who is who and how much money they have then we are only kidding ourselves into thinking that the justice system is the way to go. Another thing that really, really irks me is how the police treats this. I mean the amount of trouble they go through and their actions. I have said in the past to have witnessed a house getting stormed by what would appear to be an army of heavily armored soldiers. From what I have seen in newspapers of gun toting officers treating addicts like they were members of al qaeda. These addicts are not our enemy and shouldn't be tackled to the floor and threatened with bullets in their head if they as much bat an eye. For christ sakes, these people are sick, not deadly. They are a danger onlt to themselves and the local people are not the producers of these drugs and therefore are not the ones who will used lethal force like the true drug kingpins will in defense of their operations..

    Then again, most of our police will catch their man at all costs even if it means chasing them into a fatal wreck. It is like the cops are justified to lose whatever common sense that we all are suppose to use and doesn't care to chase a young man to his death even though they know who they are chasing. Common sense would be to back off & get the drunk or addict later instead of risking anybody and everybodys life in order to get. Now that is lunacy and nobody as much cares unless one of their loved ones are the victim of a fatal police chase. Police are running scared nowadays and are armed to the hilt. They are afraid of the very citizens that they are hired to protect. I rarely see just one patrol car on traffic stops anymore and it is always mostly two units if not three or four or more.What we are doing now has got to stop Plain and simple. I don't have the answers but after 70+ years, neither do the government and police and time to try a different approach.. I don't like to sound like I am soft on drugs either because I am not. I would love it if everybody can live without it but it isn't gonna happen.

  • A lesson that we were supposed to have learned in the 1930's Prohibition days:

    "If the criminal element was taken out of the drug usage like they did when they ended prohibition then the dangerous part of this drug war would be over." 

    The only thing that Prohibition has ever accomplished is to give rise to a criminal element.  In the 1930's, it was the Mafia...and these days, it is still the Mafia combined with the Mexican and South American cartels and drug gangs.

  • pitchfork: "Today drugs are very unsafe compared to 3-4 decades ago wouldn't you agree?

    I agree that home made crap like popbottle meth is not just of an inferior quality, but also is incredibly dangerous to ingest as there really is no telling what these amateurs have concocted.  They are absolutely insane to take that stuff whatever it is, for sure.  The saving grace here is that there are just so few really, really desparately sick people that are willing to do it, and that mainly they are harming few others when they make and use it.  I don't know if it is worse than huffing solvent fumes or not, but it is a desparate act by desparate people who need medical help.

    The kicker is that we can't make pop bottles, matches, lithium batteries, Coleman fuel, etc. illegal...thus bringing light to Larry Cleveland's statement about it being easier to stop the KY River with a broom than to stop it.   The insanity comes in when we keep trying the same old very expensive failed policies of the past and expect a different outcome.  Since our jails are overflowing with non-violent drug users, I really don't see how becoming even more draconian is going to work, and frankly, we just can't afford it.  The punishment for 1st degree murder is death or life imprisionment and it still isn't enough to keep people from doing it.

  •    Looking at the health data comparing heroin and alcohol and the list of short and long term illnesses caused by each, it is really no contest.  Heroin effects far less than 1% of our population.  Fifty percent of the adults in America are current regular drinkers, 39% of the kids ages 12-17 have had at least one drink in their lifetimes and 63% of full time college students reportedly used alcohol in the past month.  According to the CDC, there are approximately 79,000 deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use each year in the United States. This makes excessive alcohol use the 3rd leading lifestyle-related cause of death for the nation. In the single year 2005, there were more than 1.6 million hospitalizations and more than 4 million emergency room visits for alcohol-related conditions.  And this doesn't even account for all of the deaths from auto accidents and alcohol related violent crime.  And tobacco kills 440,000 people a year!  So, why again should heroin use be a top concern?  We are gagging on the gnat and swallowing the camel.

     We simply must suspend our value judgments about kinds of drugs and admit (however painful it might be) that a glass of beer on a hot afternoon and the bottle of wine with a fine meal are no different in kind from the joint of marijuana or snort of cocaine; nor is the evening devoted to cocktails essentially different from one devoted to heroin.  All are examples of the same phenomenon: the use of chemical agents to induce alterations in consciousness.  Your value judgments are of no value in determining what is going on in America.  We are spending far too much time, energy and MONEY on trying to find out why people take drugs, but in fact, what we are doing is trying to find out why some people are taking some drugs that we disapprove of.  No useful answers can come out of that sort of inquiry; the question is improperly phrased."

           I gotta admit that's a good sound point you have made here that I cannot find a retort. I use to drink, and I mean drink heavily day in and day out, at work, at home, anywhere I could get me a bottle of Beam I was drinking it. Heck I paid for the "new jail" to be built from all the fines of my drinking that lead to altercation after altercation. What I thought was fun turned out to be a total waste of my energy and time and costly, very costly.

          I also have to agree with your point on the user using the drug to escape as I did the very same thing with alcohol and drugs too. It controlled me and a DUI finally woke my butt up. It was very, very hard for me to just stop drinking, and there are a few slips I made along the way, but today I got almost a six pack in my fridge from back in the summer. I did the whole drug thing back in the day mostly smoking pot but I tried harder ones too and really didn't like where those took me and the feeling afterwards is hard for me to explain.

       Is there away to get drugs off the streets, it's been tried but in reality it appears that they have increased their presences and more and more "home made" drugs are taking over. I feel that is the concentration being applied today. Today drugs are very unsafe compared to 3-4 decades ago wouldn't you agree? It's more akin to making a fast buck than providing a high that the user enjoys, that's why you see way more arrests for crack, meth, and yes herion and not becasue they are bad drugs it's the addication levels and what a person will/does to get that high.

        In other words the dependency has actually taken over a persons life to where judgement and rationallities are out the window, which I don't think we have touched on here, and that is why drug busts are being used as a "photo op" as a form of deterrent, but it ain't working either.

     bodeen, there are more factors than there are cures. Rehab will only work if the individual will allow it to. Take for instance a person who gets a drug conviction, goes to jail, after jail into rehab. Once rehab is over, and that same person is free they return to where it all began for them and they for their effort and hard work and day to day battle to not fall back into the drug world suddenly find themselves right back in it becasue the break they got by going to rehab didn't inform them or prepare them for what was to come. No one will hire, of there are jobs, a convicted drug user.

    That's why judges do their best to lessen punishments, and those of influence do their best to help, nothing wrong with that. Hate the sin but love the sinner, so where does soceity draw the line between the two before things really get out of control? A judge can only have so much understanding and seeing the very same people week in and week out is what usually gets them thrown behind bars for a longer sentence, but then prisons and jails start to over flow, strain budgets so something has to go and it usually is the lessor drug convictions that get released. Then those lessor ones start getting more and more serious and on and on until the book hits them really hard.

        Drug laws and yes DUI laws are too soft  so something has to be done to change that process and help create a more solid deterrent from being repeated by those who mock the justice system and use the revolving door of a jail or prison. Go check out the jail website and see how many are there for simply not paying the fines associated with their charges. You'll be able to tell just from looking at their released dates and court apperances. The cost of repeating a crime pays the criminal not the justice system. Setting out a fine doesn't put the money owed into an account, it acutally places a serious strain on an already strained budget. They are paying their fines with tax payer money and living it up doing so becasue they don't have to worry about coming out of pocket for that fine.

         Gezzz I know several who even say they aren't paying and will just go and set it out. But you stick those very same people in a  poorly heated building, put a shovel in their hands and have them move a pile of rocks form one place to another then back again for the whole time they are setting out their fines and sooner than you think they won't be back. That memory of being cold or hot, working in the cold or hot takes a hold and keeps them from commiting again.

       And not to mention having to use an out house instead of a nice warm stainless steele toliet will get their attention too.

  • I believe than no matter how much teeth they put into it, it wouldn't do any good. Pitch I am sure that you believe in what you say and that you have reasons to believe that way. Until the day our worlds best justice system dispenses punishment equally and fairly to all based on the crime committed and not by who they know or HOW MUCH MONEY THEY HAVE then it is just P!ss!n in the wind. Honestly, look how long the justice system has been fighting this drug war and look at the results of it today. I do blame the system for allowing judges discreptions and le-ways to pick and choose who they want to punish the hardest. I've said all along that addictions shouldn't be a legal situation until the user disturb or harms others. Just like the man drinking beer or sippin whiskey in his home. If the criminal element was taken out of the drug usage like they did when they ended prohibition then the dangerous part of this drug war would be over. There will not be people having to risk freedom for huge profits that by being illegal demands.

    We will never stop a mans wants by threatening imprisonment. I have seen addicts on their third and fourth trip to prisons. I would think once they have dried up & gotten the drug completely out of their system then they would be able to move on without the desire to use again. NOPE! Addiction involves mental being also and that is where we are screwing up. Prisons are not designed to treat peoples mental problems and that is why the door keeps on revolving. It is costly and quite frankly stupid to keep this war going. It starts at home and todays parents are just too busy for the role. Yeah sure they care but economic situations requires both parents to work. we simply want more and are not satistfied without having more than it really takes. Nothing wrong with Rehab, unlike prisons, it works!

  • Just the facts, ma'am!

    Looking at the health data comparing heroin and alcohol and the list of short and long term illnesses caused by each, it is really no contest.  Heroin effects far less than 1% of our population.  Fifty percent of the adults in America are current regular drinkers, 39% of the kids ages 12-17 have had at least one drink in their lifetimes and 63% of full time college students reportedly used alcohol in the past month.  According to the CDC, there are approximately 79,000 deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use each year in the United States. This makes excessive alcohol use the 3rd leading lifestyle-related cause of death for the nation. In the single year 2005, there were more than 1.6 million hospitalizations and more than 4 million emergency room visits for alcohol-related conditions.  And this doesn't even account for all of the deaths from auto accidents and alcohol related violent crime.  And tobacco kills 440,000 people a year!  So, why again should heroin use be a top concern?  We are gagging on the gnat and swallowing the camel.

    We simply must suspend our value judgments about kinds of drugs and admit (however painful it might be) that a glass of beer on a hot afternoon and the bottle of wine with a fine meal are no different in kind from the joint of marijuana or snort of cocaine; nor is the evening devoted to cocktails essentially different from one devoted to heroin.  All are examples of the same phenomenon: the use of chemical agents to induce alterations in consciousness.  Your value judgments are of no value in determining what is going on in America.  We are spending far too much time, energy and MONEY on trying to find out why people take drugs, but in fact, what we are doing is trying to find out why some people are taking some drugs that we disapprove of.  No useful answers can come out of that sort of inquiry; the question is improperly phrased."
     

  • “What makes it so important is we had between eight and 10 overdoses last year … it’s killing our people,” Melton said of the growing heroin problem in Franklin County.

    I just love the Sheriff's showing of faux concern about these drugs "killing our people", when all he wants to do is lock those very same people up UNDER the jail house and throw away the key!  For every drug related death it is just one more scum ball junky "upper level trafficker" that he or his heavily-muscled manly men don't get the opportunity to have a photo op shackling and throwing into the back of a cruiser, with hands on hip, shades on head and disdaining looks all around.

    What is wrong with this picture?

  • pitchforkedtongue: "Get some real facts and proof bubba! And stop with all the Liberal biased C&P talking points."

    Hold on there Sparky, my "talking points" on this issue are conservative libertarian and the same as US House of Rep. Ron Paul and his son and Kentucky US Senator Rand Paul's positions.  I didn't make this stuff up...I learned it from that "Libtard" Ron Paul!

    I have been offering plenty of proof with my assertions...I always do!  I don't just make this stuff up like you do.  Where is you proof of any of the personal opinions that you have said?

    Fact is, Forkedtongue offers nothing but his venomous ad homenim attacks and biased opinions supported by nothing more than anecdotal evidence.  Hey, I am sorry that his family was so skewed up that they shoot up heroin, but it isn't my fault.  So, he attacks me with straw man positions that I didn't even make.  He just don't read so good and he makes stuff up...like:

    pft: "Slave owners today are called the very same thing as back then. DEMOCRATS! Check your history bubba..." 

    He does not know the very history that he tells me to check...slave owners were CONSERVATIVES, which in the 1800's were right wing Democrats or redneck Dixiecrats.  It is reversed today, but back then Republicans were almost always liberal. The Emancipation Proclamation is arguably the most liberal move by any president in US history.

    Republican Abe Lincoln was lead the party of the liberals and progressives of the day who abolished slavery. Without a doubt, he would have been a liberal Democrat today. He made his name in the Illinois legistlature by speaking out against the Mexican-American war as an excuse to spread slavery in new US territories. (can you say "ANTI-WAR LIBERAL"?!?)

    Yet, he was backed by radical Republicans and abolitionists (America's first "bleeding-heart liberals") to beat the South. Southern redneck Democrats absolutely HATED Lincoln and even accused him of being half-black...didn't he read or see the movie about Lincoln based on Doris Kern Goodwin's book? Today, those same redneck Southern Democrats would be conservative Teabagging Republicans.
     

    pft:" Drugs however, are somewhat more accessible on the streets than liquor and beer. Of course I know that if a teenager really wants either one they have little resistance or effort to obtain them through someone else, but that's were law enforcement is attacking thedrug problem is at the source of the drugs."

    Attacking "the source of the drugs" has been the primary tenet of the War on Some Drugs Other Than Alcohol and Tobacco...and it has proven over time that it is an abject failure on every front. To keep doing the same things over and over and expecting a different result is the definition of insanity.

    There hasn't been a single teenager in Franklin County found by the police possessing heroin during the past 50 years, so this whole we have to protect the teenages by throwing adults in jail thingy is a bit thin. Nobody wants teenagers to use drugs, and we have laws that directly address that problem, but that is a totally different issue that should not be conflated with adults use of drugs other than alcohol and tobacco.  We simply cannot afford to put all of these adults in jail for doing something that may or may not be less harmful than alcohol or tobacco. 

     The conventional wisdom is that these illicit drugs are "bad" and "highly addictive". They are considered so much so, that if a normal, happy, well-adjusted person were to use one or the other (or both) that they would be hopelessly addicted in short order. That is the stuff of myths. 

    Drugs are not bad, or good, rather they are neutral. Drugs do not MAKE the addict, the addicts make the drugs. To deny this fact is to try to minimize peoples' emotional state out of the equation. If this were not true, then you could not get addicted to gambling, sex, food or any other of the many things where this malady exists without a chemical precursor. 

    Addicts almost always have serious pre-existing problems with self-esteem and clinical depression. They take psychoactive drugs to self-medicate in attempt to relieve the emotional and/or physical pain associated with these conditions. I have not seen one addict who was happy and well adjusted in my entire life on this planet. Not one. No one tries (or needs) to escape from happiness. 

    Now this is not saying the happy and well adjusted folks don't use psychoactive drugs recreationally, because they do. It is prefectly normal for humans to seek altered states of consciousness. We do it from early childhood to old age. It is as normal as having sex, driving a sports car or twirling around until dizzy. 

    What I am saying is that our drug laws and therapeutic approach to treatment is based on this false premise. You cannot cure the disease of addiction without addressing the underlying psychological reasons that the individual is self-medicating. This approach is a lot more complicated than just removing the chemicals from the addict. 

    To make my point, just look at the literature on the failures of surgical intervention technics to "cure" obesity (stapling of the stomach, etc.). If it were as simple as limiting the amount of food that the fat person could process, these techniques would be raving success stories instead of tragedies in the making. 

    Drug addiction is real, but it is a symtom and not the problem itself. Assuming otherwise is simplistic thinking at best...

  • bodeen,

          I know first hand what it is like to lose a family member to a person who uses a gun, and from one who was killed at an very early age by a drunk driver. I agree the laws are lacking the teeth to keep drunk drivers accountable yet some are set as examples of what not to do and still there is a problem with drinking and driving. State use to set in Jett and wait till people would leave Midland Traven back in the day and arrest them for DUI, that's one of the reasons why law enforcement are not allowed to do that anymore. It isn't much different if hairs are to be split from law enforcement setting off East/West connector un-illuminated to catch speeders in a speed trap and that's legal.

           Drugs however, are somewhat more accessible on the streets than liquor and beer. Of course I know that if a teenager really wants either one they have little resistance or effort to obtain them through someone else, but that's were law enforcement is attacking the drug problem is at the source of the drugs.

           If anyone knew were teenagers can get beer or liquor from a store that store would be placed under surveillance, or even have someone go in and make that buy and then bust that store, and in turn that store would/should lose their ability to sell alcohol right then and there and forever!

           Street drugs however, are some what harder to rid of than alcohol abusive teenagers and sellers. You lock up the drug dealer, set bond, then hear a skill oratory from a legal mouth piece how hard that drug dealers life is and how soceity should pity him/her for thier infractions and out of jail they go. It's the heart string defense and it works pretty darn good. So much better than the same attorney pleading a drunk driver case, which I agree with you on that much, is able to do for the legal drug of alcohol.

           It's always said that the defendent had a choice to drink and drive. Well isn't it the same horse when the defendent has a choice to sell or use illegal drugs? What should be done actually is deterrent measures to rid our streets of drug dealers who come here to do just that. And one such deterrent would be a hard labor camp. It isn't inhumane and it isn't a penality that is so severe that it would cost one their life either.

         Can you imagine say someone who isn't use to working, use to warmer weather, or beiing able to get out of the cold coming here, dealing drugs, get busted, sentenced to such a camp and having to go out in weather like we have been having and working out in it? First thing that person would do upon release is get as far from here as possible. Then it becomes another communities problem and how they deal with it.

         Get rid if the bleeding heart laws and make the penality stiffer and soon you will see a different climate around our town. Or you could always let drug users and dealers use an Alford Plea, like a drunk driver can and see if that is a good deterrent other than getting voted out of public office.

  • Rethink this failed policy is what I've been basically saying all along. Rethink it in a way that it doesn't make felons out of users who doesn't know a judge or cop or anybody else who people think are important enough turn a blind eye when a friend of theirs eventually gets caught. I respect pitchforks right to hate other peoples choices but like me, he shouldn't have a say in what others do as long as they are not harming anybody but themselves. Once again, alcohol and tobacco is made out to be safer when facts prove otherwise. I have done said I know all these drugs are bad and some are down right dangerous but why are the two most dangerous drugs accepted by people who looks down on all illegal drugs.

    To me, a slobbering, staggering, limpjaw drunk is the most dangerous person we can ever encounter on the roads but look at the punishment when one is finally caught without crashing and killing some innocent stranger. LOL, Now that is funny. Nononono, we don't lock them up for months or years. We take their license for 30 days, pay $500-$700 fine and get this, send them to traffic school to re-teach them the dangers. Now, why can we not do the same for addicts and send them to rehab instead of jail on trumpted up charges? A drunk driver isn't presumed any drunker by the amount of drinks found on him and they are back to work supporting their families and still drinking right along.

    People hears of an overdose immediately think, oh what a bad drug and addict. Good rithens. When their friend gets caught drinking and driving, they help with rides. I could go on and on and have really but it just isn't fair for some to be charged and some overlooked by some link in the justice system who really shouldn't be involved unless the person harms another or property. Why not park outside of bars and wait for the real dangers to take to the roads? Oh thats right, they are not allowed to entrap. What a friggen joke!

  • Who don't read so good, or is it whom? Gezz bubba you cannot even parapharse your ownself correctly. The racist remarks is what I referred to as your  "cliche" numb nutz and it's old and stale. Would you like a word association to help your alzhemiers? Showcasing means what? Means displaying which is what you are attempting to do by what? Associating the looks of one as a Somlia pirate, the other to a steriod slamming ball player. Or what most would read from you is" that brawny white cracka, see him cuff and and stuff that helpless small framed black kid into that cop car"?

    That small framed black kid came down here to sell that sh!* on our home town streets. Maybe in your Liberal mind he's a capitalist and thank goodness it wasn't cigarettes or whiskey but anyone with more than their shoe size for an IQ can see the difference.

    Then your racism goes even further by the used of words like "shackled" and "skinhead" instead of cuffed, and balding, or to use PC terms "hair challenged". That's right out from the very same play book that your Liberal idol Sharpton would use.

    SO call me racist all you like. Try to CYA on here all you like. The truth is the more Libtarded remarks you make to forward the dumba$$ agenda that everyone white and isn't democrat is racist and all law enforcement does is sit and profile blacks the more I'm gonna be a big pain in your brain.

    And stop with all the Liberal biased C&P talking points. If things were that much of a concern for the Libtards they wouldn't be wanting more funds to keep paying the minority communities to keep voting democrat and actually be wanting funds to help up not hand out.

    Slave owners today are called the very same thing as back then. DEMOCRATS! Check your history bubba not Wikipedia for solid evidence. You just might get you some learns once you emerge from your basement and into the light of day!

  • pitchforktongue, if my posts make you feel that uncomfortable, then by all means, stop reading them.  I assure you that I am not writing them for you personal edification.  But the fact is that you can't stop, can you?  In fact, try as you might, you can't stop yourself from posting a response to nearly every post that I make.  Things that make you go Hmmmm!

    Now to address your comments...

    PFT: "Race has nothing to do with this arrest."

    How do YOU know?  Were you there?  And besides, I never said that it did or didn't which is why I called it a "cliche' that tells it all. According to current (not 1950's) data, African Americans comprise 14% of regular drug users, but are 37% of those arrested for drug offenses.  Them thar's the facts.  Apparently, the one who is ignorant of the facts is you! Plus, I said that the guy arrested looked like the Somali pirate in the movie, not that he WAS a Somali pirate, just like Redmon looks like Mark McGwire, and the similarities don't end there.  And please give me a quote of mine where I was "backing a drug dealer"...I am talking about failed insane policy here!  You still don't read so good...

    "The drug war has produced profoundly unequal outcomes across racial groups, manifested through racial discrimination by law enforcement and disproportionate drug war misery suffered by communities of color. Although rates of drug use and selling are comparable across racial lines, people of color are far more likely to be stopped, searched, arrested, prosecuted, convicted and incarcerated for drug law violations than are whites. Higher arrest and incarceration rates for African Americans and Latinos are not reflective of increased prevalence of drug use or sales in these communities, but rather of a law enforcement focus on urban areas, on lower-income communities and on communities of color as well as inequitable treatment by the criminal justice system. We believe that the mass criminalization of people of color, particularly young African American men, is as profound a system of racial control as the Jim Crow laws were in this country until the mid-1960s."

    Thanks for your continued reading of my post, as I always find your responses predictable and amusing.

  •     I mean, the cliche' in the photo above tells it all, doesn't it?  The young emaciated black man who could be a ringer for the Somali pirate who played in Tom Hanks' movie, Captain Phillips, is shackled and stuffed in the back seat of a cruiser by the massively muscular skinheaded white Deputy with sunglasses on top of his head!  Shucks, those muscles would Mark McGwire and A-Rod blush.  This is what the War on Some Drugs Other Than Alcohol and Tobacco is really all about, ain't it?

    These responses are getting stale and old man. Haven't you any idea how ignorant your postings are reading? You're stuck in the 50's with all this racsim attacks and crap and forgetting that today's herion is deadlier than that of which I wittnessed family members and their friends shooting up back in the day.

    Race has nothing to do with this arrest. And though I actually do not like or even respect Redmon whatsoever showcasing his apperence versus the Somali pirate from a movie you leave out one deatil. Somali pirates KILL people for profit the very same thing this dealer and his drugs have done and will continue to do.

    Perhaps a member of your family needs to die of an over dose before you realize how stupid backing a drug dealer actually is. And comparing arrest results of today to those of 50 years ago is a bit of a reach wouldn't you think?

    Where is your proof  profiling is happening? Assumed assumptions is the work of a wanna be dime store detective novel writer trying to bed the soda girl. Get some real facts and proof bubba!

  • And I repeat the challenge to Sheriff Melton:

    "If you really want to arrest a major heroin dealer, why don't you and your Deputies go up to Detroit and arrest those guys who Jackson bought his heroin from? Afraid of getting a few of those bullet holes in your cruiser? Those guys have guns!  Hey, you can always send in one of your confidential informants like you did with Charles Monroe...what possibly could go wrong?

     

  • ffort2013, January 24, 2014 7:34PM

    "They rented a car and drove off and were stopped. Hmm interesting. So if I rent a car, pull in to traffic I will be profiled as a drug dealer?"

    Maybe, if you looked more like a Somali pirate!  I suspect that this was not a cold stop and they knew who they were looking at, due to a snitch ratting them out.  The question is why didn't they have an actual "buy" on these guys if they were such high level bad hombres?  And where were their guns?  High level heroin dealers always have guns don't they, especially if they are being shot AT!  You would think that upper level heroin dealers have much more than 9.3 grams INCLUDING THE BAGGIE!  But like the Loch Ness Monster, the truth is that there are no high level heroin dealers around here, never have been, or at least one of them would have been caught in the last 50 years, doncha' think?  Or killed?  Or something?  That is just a myth.

    The Sheriff's Office is out in I-64 every day profiling folks just passing through our county who they suspect may be carrying contraband.  What "look" are they going for?  And every now and then we are told that they catch someone.  The question is how many do they stop, frisk or otherwise harass who are completely innocent and guilty of nothing but driving through Franklin County?  Is this trolling what we elected Pat Melton to do?

  • The drug heroin has been demonized by the government's authorities (DEA is a bunch of cops, NOT doctors) but in reality is would be very difficult for any of us to tell the difference in the effects of heroin and any of the opiates that are contained in pain medications today.  They all basically feel and do the same things.

    And as history tells us, the differences in the penalties and the point of emphasis of law enforcement are more political than medical.  Back in 1914, when the Harrison Narcotic Act criminalized heroin (and pot, for that matter), these drugs were used by blacks and Chinese, both of whom were subject to institutionalized racial discrimation in this country....barely a step above slavery.  This chapter of history was not something that any of us should be proud of, much less perpetuate it's unenlightened vestiges into our laws and policies today.

    "In the 1800s opiates and cocaine were mostly unregulated drugs. In the 1890s the Sears & Roebuck catalogue, which was distributed to millions of Americans homes, offered a syringe and a small amount of cocaine for $1.50.

    At the beginning of the 20th century, cocaine began to be linked to crime. In 1900, the Journal of the American Medical Association published an editorial stating, "Negroes in the South are reported as being addicted to a new form of vice – that of 'cocaine sniffing' or the 'coke habit.'" Some newspapers later claimed cocaine use caused blacks to rape white women and was improving their pistol marksmanship. Chinese immigrants were blamed for importing the opium-smoking habit to the U.S. The 1903 blue-ribbon citizens' panel, the Committee on the Acquirement of the Drug Habit, concluded, "If the Chinaman cannot get along without his dope we can get along without him.

    The drafters played on fears of “drug-crazed, sex-mad negroes” and made references to Negroes under the influence of drugs murdering whites, degenerate Mexicans smoking marijuana, and “Chinamen” seducing white women with drugs. Dr. Hamilton Wright, testified at a hearing for the Harrison Act. Wright alleged that drugs made blacks uncontrollable, gave them superhuman powers and caused them to rebel against white authority. Dr. Christopher Koch of the State Pharmacy Board of Pennsylvania testified that "Most of the attacks upon the white women of the South are the direct result of a cocaine-crazed Negro brain".

    Before the Act was passed, on February 8, 1914, The New York Times published an article entitled "Negro Cocaine 'Fiends' Are New Southern Menace: Murder and Insanity Increasing Among Lower-Class Blacks" by Edward Huntington Williams, which reported that Southern sheriffs had increased the caliber of their weapons from .32 to .38 to bring down Negroes under the effect of cocaine."

     

    Pretty enlightened stuff, huh?  Some drugs may interfere with a person's ability to make healthy choices for themselves, but these folks stopped making healthy choices a LOOOONG time ago. They drink to excess, smoke cigarettes, eat really bad food, are overweight and don't exercise. Can we really protect them from themselves when they seem bent on self-destruction?  Not hardly.  Opiates, cocaine and pain pills are actually the least of their problems...they are but symptoms of their real problems.

    But I am not telling you guys anything, because nearly all of us have in the past been prescribed and taken pain meds and knows what I am talking about.  I have asked all of my friends and family if they like taking pain meds, and Nobody said that they did!  It appears that the only folks that want to take this stuff all of the time have serious pre-existing emotional problems, depression or are bi-polar...and they are in a tiny minority.

    Quite frankly, if it is not pain pills or opiates (synthetic or otherwise), it would be something else. Considering that there are hundreds of household items that will get you high (virtually anything with a VOC or antihistamine) and that we aren't going to make them ALL illegal, this seems like a problem that cannot be resolved. Especially by the police.  

    Which brings me to my point...if these very widely prescribed pain pills that have been taken by nearly all of us and we didn't jump off a cliff into the vestiges of chemical addiction, then why are these things considered so dangerous that we are willing to spend vast sums of our tax dollars in trying to stop a tiny fraction of sick people in our population from taking them? 

    We have been trying the exact same failed policies to eradicate this stuff for 50+ years and it hasn't even reduced the availability on the street.  In fact, if the Sheriff is correct in his statements, the availability of heroin in Frankfort is actually on the increase.  How's that War on Some Drugs Other Than Alcohol and Tobacco working out for ya' there Sheriff Melton?  By your own admission, you have actually lost ground, not gained any. Of course, I strongly suspect that the increase in arrests for these drugs isn't because of an increase in availability or useage, but because of the zero tolerance point of emphasis of the police around here to catch every druggie who dares to ingest anything other than alcohol and tobacco.

    And it is working to an extent, as they went through this tiny group that were using heroin like aids through the gays in San Fransico...with the culminationof this very expensive effort being in this bust, as evidenced by, “Mr. Jackson is one of the major heroin dealers,” Melton said.  It is important to note that NONE of these people who are being caught by the police are teenagers or kids...these are all adults and usually over 30.  Has anyone seen a report made in the last 50 years where kids were involved?  

    As far as these failed policies actually eradicting pain meds, anyone with a computer and a credit card can buy them from India at wholesale and if you have a Bitcoin account, you can buy heroin.  The bottom line is that they are readily available to any danged fool who wants to take them.  And it seems that every few days this newspaper and others have another front page story about some poor people who are caught with a small quantity that is trumped up to "trafficking", or actually selling as little as one or two pills to a snitch.  How long is this going to be front page news?  Or news at all?

    How long are we going to waste our tax dollars on a problem that cannot be resolved?  Maybe we need to rethink this thing through some more...as obviously what we are doing is NOT working.  To continue to implement the failed policies of the past is insane, by definition.  How long are we going to let this make us go insane?
     

  • Another reason I hate seeing people get charged and reamed over their personal choices is because as in todays paper. here we have a young woman who has a very bad attitude facing a judge to get her sentence and a former powerful supreme court judge steps up out of nowheres and interupts a court proceeding to the point of delaying sentencing. This judge basically told our judge and prosecutors not to sentence this woman to an ALREADY PLEA DEAL and let her do a diversion so that she will not have a felony record that will harm her the rest of her life. The same felony that harms everybody that gets one. This judge happens to eat at a restaurant where this woman works and thinks he knows her better than what her actions and record says. Why would a judge do this? I have my guesses.

    Why do we allow people to get off because of who they know and why are only certain people targeted for entrapment while other more well known people aren't? If everybody can be honest and admit that they have done something illegal at one time or another, including the police and politicians who are still doing their illegal drugs of choice then most would say, Yes drugs are bad for the users but are not a danger to the citizens. Unfortunatly we have a law enforcement sheriff who consentrates only on drugs and makes sure that every user he preys on is blasted in the paper, Tv and his facebook page and portrays them to be dangerous, violent and a threat to all of Franklin county. He boasts that hes the only lawman that will fight drug and that we need him to save us from these hoodlums. While his men are sitting in parking lots watching people getting set up, theives are stealing air conditioning units an arms throw from his office. Drunks are driving all over this county and wrecking a lot lately. Children are being abused and home invasions has shot through the roof. I realize he can't be everywheres and cannot catch everybody but where should he be? Probably patroling more minimize real threats instead of worrying what adults are doing in their own homes and keeping an eye on his own porch, so to speak!.

  • Steve I enjoy expressing my views and seeing others opinions on controversial topics and never try to imply that I am always right, only how I see it. I see no sense in belittling people who disagrees with me because all it does is make me look like a dumb fool. I do know lots about addictions from different drugs. Members of my extended family (including myself) has served as an experiment with most drugs whether legal or illegal. None of them are good no matter how legal they are but it is kinda ironic and definately hypacritical that we accept some very dangerous drugs as ok even though they are responsible for killing millions and some drugs we make it a crime.

    Some folks can drink and function fine while some cannot, the same holds true for users of illegal drugs but we treat those users as criminals. A big reason some people overdoses is because those drugs are illegal and risky to be caught with so they are cut and altered to enhance the profits. Look at all they allow to be put in my drug of choice cigarettes to make them more appealing and to enhance profits. Aint no difference in my opinion but when certain drugs are legalized then they are controled better. People should never start using heroin in the first place but who am I to say what others should or shouldn't do, I started smoking when people were saying the same thing about cigarettes. We are not going to stop people from doing what they want no matter how much money it costs us to try. Homo is right on a lot of this even though his way of arguing offends some.  Thanks Steve.

  • They rented a car and drove off and were stopped. Hmm interesting. So if I rent a car, pull in to traffic I will be profiled as a drug dealer?

    I am happy they are behind bars and drugs are off the street but I am not buying the "upper level heroin dealer" or significant amount (it really isn't) in my opinion.   

    Good job Deputy Redmon, you need a sock cap because it's cold outside.

  • steve_fry, January 24, 2014 2:32PM

    "Good god, Homo, talk about hyperbole! When did I EVER say I had a liquor store??"

    No hyperbole here, Boss.  I remember distinctly you referring to your favorite Red Dot Liquors on the West side as "my liquor store".  It does not mean that you actually own it, but that you buy enough rotgut there to have some loyalty and a sense of kinship with those particular drug dealers.  It seems that just the thought of having to consider that your drug of choice is much worse on the body than heroin is making you a bit uncomfortable, but is it enough to make you think?

    It is not my intention to talk to you like a child, but I must admit, I am having to break it down to the basics for some of the posters on here. So, you say that you want the scientific explanation? Over all alcohol out of all the drugs of abuse (heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine….) is the hardest on the body and causes the most direct physical changes and toxicity, in particular the liver. Alcohol is also a neurotoxic.

    The therapeutic index (also known as therapeutic ratio) is a comparison of the amount of a therapeutic agent that causes the therapeutic effect to the amount that causes death (in animal studies) or toxicity (in human studies). Quantitatively, it is the ratio given by the lethal or toxic dose divided by the therapeutic dose. In animal studies, the therapeutic index is the lethal dose of a drug for 50% of the population (LD50) divided by the minimum effective dose for 50% of the population (ED50).   

    While the lethal dose is important to determine in animal studies, there are usually severe toxicities that occur at sublethal doses in humans, and these toxicities often limit the maximum dose of a drug. A higher therapeutic index is preferable to a lower one, as someone would have to take a much higher dose of such a drug to reach the lethal/toxic threshold than the dose taken to elicit the therapeutic effect. 

    Ethanol, the from of alcohol in rot gut has a therapeutic index of 70:1, while opiates such as heroin and morphine have an index of 10:1. which is much safer.

     

    BTW, what part of my answer to your inquirey about what part of the following sentence was wrong?  The Sheriff boasted, “Franklin County is a better place today because of the work done by the sheriff’s deputies.”

    Or for that matter S_F, what part of anything that I have written on this whole danged thread is wrong? Anybody? 

     

  • Thanks, Bodeen, for not talking to me like a child or an _sshole.

  • Good god, Homo, talk about hyperbole! When did I EVER say I had a liquor store?? Yes, I try to use the local businesses when I can, and many times I talk them up a little so they'll advertise with us. You really don't need to get all p!ssy when you could calm down and talk rationally and not fly off the dámn handle. (scrolloing down to finish reading your latest diatribe)

     

  • Once again Bodeen, you speak with clarity and truth.  

    The Sheriff's comment, “Franklin County is a better place today because of the work done by the sheriff’s deputies.” that S_F was referring to as being the truth, is not based on relative threats. The overly broad statement has no context...which the SJ should easily have picked up on. Maybe they did pick up on it, but these "reporters" don't ask questions and they certainly do not follow up on anything.

    For this statement to mean anything, it must have some context.  Just making the pronouncement of "Franklin County being a better place today" because they arrested some poor black kids who possessed 9.5 grams (1/3 ounce, or a little more than a US quarter weighs) with no evidence that they sold any of it to anybody, means little.  The question is "being a better place" (or safer) for whom?  

    For sure, 99.9999% of Franklin Countians will not be effected one iota, even indirectly, by whether these people were arrested, or not.  The impacts of jailing these 2 guys for mulitple years @ $40K per year each will be much more than any threat that they posed to us.  The percent of those good people of Franklin County who would have purchased heroin from these people is even smaller still, and that assumes that any of it was actually for sale.

    As for S_F, the relative threat to him from these people was close to absolute zero, while the real threat to him would be at his favorite Red Dot Liquors, and that threat may be realized through his liver or other vital organs.  

    Like I have said before, if you are booting black tar heroin everyday, then the drug is the least of your problems...it is merely a symptom.  These folks that the Sheriff has been arresting are not hard core junkies...these small quantities wouldn't last them much more than a day if they were. And for those of you who are keeping score between the health impacts on the demonized heroin user and the guy who just enjoys sucking down "holiday spirits" (as the Editor calls them) made by several major drug manufacturers right here in our community and served world wide, here are the facts from the National Institute of Health...it really is no contest:

    According to the NIH:

    "Drinking too much – on a single occasion or over time – can take a serious toll on your health including addiction.  Here’s how alcohol can affect your body:

    Brain:
    Alcohol interferes with the brain’s communication pathways, and can affect the way the brain looks and works. These disruptions can change mood and behavior, and make it harder to think clearly and move with coordination.  

    Up to 80 percent of alcoholics have a deficiency in thiamine, and some of these people will go on to develop serious brain disorders such as Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). WKS is a disease that consists of two separate syndromes, a short–lived and severe condition called Wernicke’s encephalopathy and a long–lasting and debilitating condition known as Korsakoff’s psychosis.

    The symptoms of Wernicke’s encephalopathy include mental confusion, paralysis of the nerves that move the eyes (i.e., oculomotor disturbances), and difficulty with muscle coordination. 

    Heart:
    Drinking a lot over a long time or too much on a single occasion can damage the heart, causing problems including:

    Cardiomyopathy – Stretching and drooping of heart muscle
    Arrhythmias – Irregular heart beat
    Stroke
    High blood pressure  

    Research also shows that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may protect healthy adults from developing coronary heart disease.

    Liver:
    Heavy drinking takes a toll on the liver, and can lead to a variety of problems and liver inflammations including:

    Steatosis, or fatty liver
    Alcoholic hepatitis
    Fibrosis
    Cirrhosis

    Pancreas:
    Alcohol causes the pancreas to produce toxic substances that can eventually lead to pancreatitis, a dangerous inflammation and swelling of the blood vessels in the pancreas that prevents proper digestion. 

    Cancer:
    Drinking too much alcohol can increase your risk of developing certain cancers, including cancers of the:

    Mouth
    Esophagus
    Throat
    Liver
    Breast

    Immune System:
    Drinking too much can weaken your immune system, making your body a much easier target for disease.  Chronic drinkers are more liable to contract diseases like pneumonia and tuberculosis than people who do not drink too much.  Drinking a lot on a single occasion slows your body’s ability to ward off infections – even up to 24 hours after getting drunk."

     

    And then there is heroin:

    "Major health problems from heroin include miscarriages, heart infections, addiction and death from overdose. People who inject the drug also risk getting infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS and hepatitis."

     

    No contest, like I said.  The biggest problem with heroin is that it is illegal and most of these health problems that the NIH cites would be voided if heroin were legal...no more drug overdoses, no heart infections and HIV/hepatitis from dirty needles.  There are many ways to ingest heroin other than shooting it.

     

    I am not making this stuff up...

  • Steve you posted as I was writing mine and I didn't see yours. You like most people, made lite of the dangers of tobacco and alcohol and these drugs are proven to have killed and harmed far more people. I would be afraid to see heroin become legal but at the same time, why do we make criminals out of people who wants to use other drugs. If they were legal then the price would be  much lower and users wouldn't be driven to crimes to support their habits. It has worked in other countries and the drugs would be made safer. They will never ever get rid of mans wants for drugs and making criminals out of them with life long felony records hurts us all and destroys a mans chance to get decent jobs. I see pros and cons but what we are doing now is just plain wrong and hypocritical.

  • Bodeen: "Homo 9 grams is a lot of heroin but I agree that the sheriffs math is bullcrap."

    A lot of heroin to whom?  It is all relative,which seems to be a lost art in recognizing thse days. Certainly not to a real junkie that uses 2-3 grams a day.  Our elected official's public policy that costs us tax money should be based on the facts and the truth, not intellectually dishonest justifications!

    The rest of your post is spot on!

  • I mean, the cliche' in the photo above tells it all, doesn't it?  The young emaciated black man who could be a ringer for the Somali pirate who played in Tom Hanks' movie, Captain Phillips, is shackled and stuffed in the back seat of a cruiser by the massively muscular skinheaded white Deputy with sunglasses on top of his head!  Shucks, those muscles would Mark McGwire and A-Rod blush.  This is what the War on Some Drugs Other Than Alcohol and Tobacco is really all about, ain't it?

  • steve_fry, January 24, 2014 10:53AM

    “Franklin County is a better place today because of the work done by the sheriff’s deputies.”

    What part of that sentence is wrong?"

     

    Because arresting these penny ante druggies isn't enough of a problem to make this a better place, not even close, much less to justify the $1.8 million budget that we give to him to spend on trying to eradicate it.  That is why the Sheriff is reduced to grossly inflating the scope of the problem to try to justify it.  It is intellectually dishonest, so why is the SJ going along with it?

    We still have two major distilleries manufacturing toxic and addictive drugs by the tankcar full, and distributing them throughout the world...legal and officially sanctioned drugs that YOU admit to using so regularly that you claim a liquor store as your own.  These lethal and addictive drugs are the 3rd leading cause of preventable death in this country! Drugs that 50 counties in KY considers so noxious and dangerous that they are illegal to possess or sell.

    And then there is tobacco...need I say more?  Looks to me like we are gagging on the gnat and swallowing the camel whole here.  The Sheriff is just beating his own drum for reasons that are obvious...and the SJ helps!  You guys in the media are supposed to be the smart ones... 

    Like I said below, I can assure you that all of the facts indicate that the War on Some Drugs Other Than Alcohol and Tobacco is a failure on many fronts and is certifiably insane...a fact that our own Prosecutor Larry Cleveland acknowleged a while back when he candidly stated,"Stopping drug trafficking is like trying to stop the Kentucky River with a broom."  Now as you have to admit, anyone going out on the KY River with a broom and trying to stop the flow would be certifiably insane, right?  

  • obvious that they are hoping people will forget about it and let him off.

  • I started not to comment but what the heck. Homo 9 grams is a lot of heroin but I agree that the sheriffs math is bullcrap. There wasn't 90 people there waiting to buy and this amount was likely to be used by less than 10 people with avarage heroin addiction so it isn't nothing like the 10s of thousand dollars worth of painpills they confiscated in the past. Once again he is trying to scare people to think Frankfort has been overtaken by drugs  and hes the only lawman willing to fight it when it isn't any different than it was when he was a deputy and at the same time, pat himself on the back. I personally think heroin is one nasty drug and the people who uses it needs help really bad. With that said, I also think alcohol is even nastier and causes way way more deaths and wrecks way way more families. They ain't much difference in either when it comes to the harm that they cause other than alcohol has killed considerably more people. Why is one tolerated and the other isn't. Why imprison a man because he doesn't follow the status quo and uses a different drug to get his high.

    I am a smoker and nobody will ever convince me that cigarettes should not be illegal. I am addicted bad to them so I know a little bit about addiction. I got to have my coffee and cig first thing in the morning and then throughout the day. Am I a bad person because I chose to do the LEGAL DRUGS that causes more deaths and harm and let the government make money off it. Why are these people who uses drugs that kills far less people being preyed on and blasted in the paper as bottom dwellers of society. Evil people who we need to be afraid of.

    The drug problem and usage all starts at home and that is where it is up to us teach the dangers of it and the fight needs to start and end there and if it can't then medical intervention is warrented, not jails. These people here will most likely get off with probation and continue on with their habits as long as they PAY their lawyers, PAY their fines, PAY their parole officer, Pay their monthly drug tests, PAY, their bogus counsellors, PAY PAY PAY PAY, Pay (money) is what they are really worried about because if really care about dangerous drugs then they would outlaw tobacco, alcohol, caffeine etc. As long as I pay my taxes on my drug of choice then I will be free to use and kill myself without worries of scared officers busting my door in with weapons drawn while screaming their heads off and raiding my home for whatever they want and hope that they dont take me batting my eyes as a threat to their lives. I get where you are coming from Homo!

    By the way, has anybody heard yet of the thieving former deputy who preyed on people like these and was caught stealing? It has been over a year now and obvious that they are hoping people will forget about it him off.

  • capitalcitizen, rather than trying to psychoanalize me personally for what possible motives that I have to calling truth to power and the waste of our precious and scarce tax dollars on this charade, why not tell us what I said in my post that is incorrect?  You know, something that requires some actual thought like logically deconstructing my post.  I will give you an example of how this works with your comment below:

    Capital: "Why do you have such an animus towards people arrested drug dealers, unless you, yourself, is (sic) a drug user and dealer?"

    I have no animus towards people (police) who arrest druggies (like in this case, not proven drug dealers) per se, but I do have a problem with an official police policy that emphasizes these arrest of penny ante druggies at the expense of investigating all other violent crimes and addressing the real threats to our society.  It really is about the purposeful dishonest way that the authorities inflate drug use (other than alcohol and tobacco) to make it seem like a real problem that threatens us all, when there is no data that indicates that...like I said in my post below.

    Now, concerning your assertion that my motives of pointing these inconvenient truths out must be due to me being a "drug user and a dealer", let's look at that logically.  Why does it have to require a "drug user and a dealer" to point out the obvious insanity, inconsistencies and wasteful tax expenditures of our police force on a relatively minor problem that cannot be resolved?  

    I can assure you that all of the facts indicate that the War on Some Drugs Other Than Alcohol and Tobacco is a failure on many fronts and is certifiably insane...a fact that our own Prosecutor Larry Cleveland acknowleged a while back when he candidly stated, "Stopping drug trafficking is like trying to stop the Kentucky River with a broom."  Now as you have to admit, anyone going out on the KY River with a broom and trying to stop the flow would be certifiably insane, right?  So why am I the one who is HIGH for suggesting that we stop this insanity?  I am the one who is sober here! What does that make you?

    As far as you contention that I must be a "drug dealer" to speak out for an end to the insane drug policies of prohibition, ask yourself, "why that is a possible motive?"

    If the end to prohibition comes about, that would naturally put illicit drug dealers out of business, right? So, why would any drug dealer want that?

    By my speaking out to power for an end to this insane and futile prohibition, I would be defeating my own economic self-interest, and if I did that then I would be no better than a Republican!  

    Duhhh! 

    So, capitalcitizen, maybe you need to rethink this thingy through some more now that I have shown you how it works.

     

  • “Franklin County is a better place today because of the work done by the sheriff’s deputies.”

    What part of that sentence is wrong?

  • As I read the story, Melton's "new math" was explaining to us non-heroin-users just how much 1/3-ounce of heroin was. Wow you really DO have an axe to grind with Melton! This is heroin, fer crissakes, not some "gateway" drug (like pot, alcohol or cigarettes). Good riddance!

  • Why are you, Homosapien, so angry at the sheriff for doing his job?

    Why do you have such an animus towards people arrested drug dealers, unless you, yourself, is a drug user and dealer?

     

  • Who did these guys sell heroin to?  Why is there no evidence of an actual sale?

  • “What makes it so important is we had between eight and 10 overdoses last year … it’s killing our people,” Melton said of the growing heroin problem in Franklin County.

    So, which was it, 8 or 10?  Where is the confusion here?  Can't make up your mind?  Where did those numbers come from anyway?   There were only 143 deaths related to heroin in the entire state of 4.3 million people last year, and you are claiming that we had 10 right here in Mayberry, and it wasn't even in the newspaper?  How does someone actually die of a heroin overdose in Franklin County and it not make front page news? Have you seen what passes for front page news around here lately?  I call BS on that one Sheriff...preposterous!

    "“Franklin County is a better place today because of the work done by the sheriff’s deputies.”

    Why does the State Journal let this stuff pass for news when it really is just a campaign ad? This stuff would make NJ Gov. Chris Christie proud!

  • "Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton said the heroin seized from a Centennial Drive apartment would have been enough to supply about 90 people with a bindle — a tenth of a gram — each. Melton said a bindle sells for about $30, making the heroin worth nearly $2,800.

    “It’s a significant amount,” Melton said. “Mr. Jackson is one of the major heroin dealers,” Melton said. “He’s one of the upper level heroin dealers in our community.”"

    Really Sheriff Melton?  A significant amount to whom?  Why did you divide this minute amount, (1/3 of an ounce) of heroin into 10ths of a gram?  Is that what they call 'New Math' or just plain old War on Some Drugs other than Alcohol and Tobacco embellishment?   A real heroin addict will consume 2-3 grams a day, so 9.3 grams is a minor PERSONAL stash for a real addict!

    I do not doubt that this is "one of the upper level heroin dealers in our community”, but it just goes to show how penny ante that the heroin trade is in Franklin County,in spite of your bellicose declarations.  Why don't you and your Deputies go up to Detroit and arrest those guys who Jackson bought his heroin from? Afraid of getting a few of those bullet holes in your cruiser? Hey, you can always send in one of your confidential informants like you did with Charles Monroe...what possibly could go wrong?