KSU drops 645 students for nonpayment

Burse warns of historic financial deficit

State Journal staff report, Published:

Kentucky State University is dropping 645 students for not making the required payments, the university announced Wednesday.

Some students have balances ranging as high as $40,000 stretching over two years, according to a news release. 

“We face a nearly $7 million historic deficit largely due to 645 students that have not paid KSU this fall,” interim President Raymond Burse said in the release. “This is terribly unfortunate, and we must take the necessary steps to protect KSU’s financial stability.”

Burse announced Tuesday that after months of constant contact and financial counseling with those students, they will be removed from enrollment this week for failing to meet their financial obligations. This is a process that for some has spanned over 18 months, previously under the direction of former KSU president Mary Evans Sias, who retired in June.

Under Burse’s direction, the KSU foundations were ordered last month to pay balances for all students whose account balances were less than $1,000 (111 students totaling roughly $97,000). He also ordered that $65,000 worth of scholarships and book vouchers be awarded to 42 students who were poised to graduate this year or were first-time students.

“We have done everything we can to help students who need it the most,” said Burse. “The last thing we want to ever do is remove a student from enrollment, but the university cannot endure the entire burden.”

“I am dedicated to working hard to take KSU to the next level as an institution, but to do so everyone must do their part and be held accountable,” said Burse.

 Releasing the students from enrollment is the final step the university is taking in a process that started in August 2013, the news release said.

According to the release:

>Students not meeting their financial obligations were informed by the university about its payment plan 22 times over a 14-month period, including seven times since June 2014.

>They were counseled 13 times and encouraged to sign payment agreements with the university.

>Financial aid disbursements were released 10 days prior to the first day of classes, on Aug. 16, 2014, and are ongoing.

See Thursday’s paper for more details.

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  • @Bruno:

    I never made the claim it would be simple to break the cycle; in fact it takes a lot of hard work, dedication and maybe starting over and over. When you get knocked down you get back up and try harder next time. It’s going to be difficult but a person has to try and the successful ones do. Some even catch a few breaks along the way because someone on the success ladder saw how hard they were trying to accomplish a goal.

    Your solution is to set back and let the government give me stuff. You act as though somebody owes somebody something. You worry more about how other people have been successful than you do about how am I going to be successful. Woe is me, have pity on me, take care of me, help me, it’s me, it’s me, it’s all about me.

    I also suspect you will say that is why the enrollment acceptance rate is roughly 20% lower at KSU than UK.

    I thought blacks won the Civil War and Civil Rights. Seems with those two big wins in your column you can still come up with excuses to hold them back. 

    Sometimes you can be so close to the problem, you can’t see the solution.

  • KSU is facing a $7 million deficit. I'd call those 'tough times' for the university, wouldn't you? You're the one living in a Fox News-like bubble if you disagree.

  • steve_fry, September 3, 2014 1:44PM

    "Tough times call for tough decisions. :o\"

    So, why are these such "tough times"?  Isn't that a mytholgical world created under the FOX NEWS bubble?  Seems to me that the economy is steaming along quite fabulously these days.  Being in the newspaper biz you should know this. Thank you President Obama!

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/04/business/economy/all-fed-regions-report-growth-as-economy-improves.html?_r=0

     

    WASHINGTON — The economy strengthened in all regions of the country in July and August, including in areas like consumer spending, auto sales and tourism, the Federal Reserve reported in a survey released on Wednesday.

    A separate report from the Commerce Department showed that business orders for factory goods shot up by a record amount in July, reflecting a surge in demand in the volatile category of commercial aircraft. But outside of transportation, orders actually fell slightly during the month, although the setback was expected to be temporary.

    The Fed said all 12 of its regions reported growth. Six — New York, Cleveland, Chicago, Minneapolis, Dallas and San Francisco — characterized growth as “moderate.” The other regions reported somewhat slower expansion. Four described growth as “modest,” and two noted signs of improvement.

    The survey found no clear evidence that the economy was expanding so fast that the Fed might soon need to begin raising interest rates to prevent inflation.

    Continue reading the main story

    Factory Orders

    Manufacturers’ total new orders, seasonally adjusted.

    MAY

    +0.6%

    JUNE

    +1.5%

    JULY

    +10.5%

    $560

    billion

    540

    520

    500

    480

    460

    ’13

    ’14

    Source: Commerce Department

    Most regions reported optimism about crucial economic sectors. A majority cited increased loan demand, for example, and hotel occupancies.

    The survey, known as the Beige Book, is based on anecdotal reports from businesses and will be considered with other data when Fed policy makers meet on Sept. 16 and 17.

    After that meeting, the Fed is expected to reduce its monthly bond purchases for a seventh time but leave its key short-term interest rate unchanged. That rate has been near zero since December 2008 in an effort to overcome the financial crisis and revive the economy.

    Now, with job growth strong and unemployment falling, investors have been speculating about when the Fed will start raising rates. Most analysts think the first increase will occur around mid-2015.

    In other economic news, the Commerce Department said factory orders rose 10.5 percent in July, the biggest one-month increase on record going back to 1992. Orders for civilian jetliners rose fourfold. But excluding transportation, orders edged down 0.8 percent and an important category that serves as a proxy for business investment plans fell 0.7 percent.

    Manufacturing has been a source of strength this year, helped by robust demand for new cars, other consumer items and business equipment. Economists expect that strength to continue.

    The report showed that orders for durable goods, items expected to last at least three years, were up 22.6 percent in July, unchanged from the estimate in a preliminary report last week. Orders for nondurable goods such as paper, chemicals and food were down 0.9 percent in July after a 0.4 percent increase in June.

    In addition to the surge in demand for airplanes, orders for motor vehicles and parts rose 7.3 percent, reflecting continued strong consumer demand for new cars and trucks.

    But there was slippage in other areas. Orders for primary metals such as steel fell 0.3 percent, demand for machinery was down 1.2 percent, and orders for computers and other electronics products fell 14.7 percent.

    Most economists expect that manufacturing production will provide solid support in the second half of this year.

  • http://graphics8.nytimes.com/newsgraphics/2014/09/03/factory-orders/d5089a556d79b42d3235142517df8c98d0745196/0904-WEB-ECON-Factory-Orders-Artboard_1.png

  • gayle_woods, September 4, 2014 9:12PM

    "@Bruno Trick question. You are trying to bait me into saying the latter so you can call me a racist. Truth is those who want to break the cycle do."

    It is not a trick question, it is called multiple choice...all that you did was add a magical non-option, c. Truth is those who want to break the cycle do.  

    So, it is just that simple, all that they have to do is "want to"...kinda like Dorthy, when all she had to do was click those ruby slippers heels together 3 times while saying repeating, "There's no place like home, there's no place like home..."

    Gee, I wish I had all of that experience dealing with people as Officer Friendly to draw on so that I could have overly simplistic magical options for our broken societal problems coming out of my ears too.  Problem is that poor black girls aren't born with ruby slippers on their feet...that is one of them "white privilege" perks I was tellin' you about.  

    And wouldn't one of those things that would have to be there for those who "want to" really badly be a college education?  And hasn't the Repugs' AUSTERITY made college so expensive that poor people have a very small chance of completing...where "only 9% of low-income students got college diplomas."

     

     

  • @Bruno Trick question. You are trying to bait me into saying the latter so you can call me a racist. Truth is those who want to break the cycle do.

  • gayle_woods, September 4, 2014 3:30PM

    "Let's say the graduation rates at KSU triple that would still only put them it in the 12% range, with the student/teacher ration being 14:1 there still seems to be more problems than just money."

    So, what on earth do you think those mo'problems could be, gayle_woods?  The way that I see it there can only be two reasons why what you say is true.  Either the society that they grew up in is seriously flawed with the centuries of abuse, racsim, poor education, systematic discrimination and institutionalized prejudices, poverty, etc., or black people simply are genetically inferior.  Which is it?

  • n4s: "I don't recall Republicans paying any of my tuition. Yes the government did help me with tuition as part of my benefit package earned by service in the military. I also busted my arse in Vincent Fisters warehouse and drove a truck for the same company.  I will grant you that tuition was much less then, but so was everything else."

    That is because they didn't...they were responsible for the huge cuts...austerity they call it.  So, where do you think that your benefits package opportunities came from?  The Republicans? The conservatives?  Ha!

    Your tuition was much much less then.

    AUSTERITY...that is the culprit.  Fact is, nobody around here wants to pay taxes to support higher education.  Sad, but true.

  • As tough as paying for college is (I have two there now), and however much tougher it is for kids from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, the chances of funding going up in Kentucky are pretty slim. Between the pension issues and the increased amount we'll have to pay for Medicaid, Kentucky will operate with less $$ in the future for everything else.

  • As tough as paying for college is (I have two there now), and however much tougher it is for kids from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, the chances of funding going up in Kentucky are pretty slim. Between the pension issues and the increased amount we'll have to pay for Medicaid, Kentucky will operate with less $$ in the future for everything else.

  • Bruno- It's called sacrafice in many of the circumstances where ADULTS were sent home because they didn't pay their bill.  My child has tuition much higher than KSU but our family paid off two cars which both near 200k miles. We don't have car payments so we can pay for our children to go to school.  Some of those ADULTS were sent home for owing 1200.00. 1200.00 freaking dollars.  I bet parents spent more than that on buying sugar and alcohol. 

    Here's the deal. If you want to go to school, go to school. If you owe money after the aid has given you the max amount and you don't pay your bill from last semester don't enroll next semester. Work at McDonald's flipping burgers or cleaning tables like I did when I first got out on my own. Don't tell me fast food isn't hiring people without a degree.  There was a time in my life that I worked three jobs to provide for my child and NEVER EVER asked for family or gov't handouts.

    The FAFSA form tells you at the end how much your family contribution will be.  Uh if you and/or your family can't pay then you stay home, work, take online courses and save money until you can pay it.

    I mean think about it.  If you hire an attorney to represent you in court and you don't pay.....will he/she still represent you? Uh...DOH! NO

  • @Bruno:

    And yet wilth all that you dems still advocate for bigger government. Wow! Do you see any difference between the state (government) run universities and the private universities in Kentucky as it pertains to graduation levels and what kind of graduate they produce?

  • Let's say the graduation rates at KSU triple that would still only put them it in the 12% range, with the student/teacher ration being 14:1 there still seems to be more problems than just money. Also, where are all these higher paying jobs going to come from if we start producing higher graduation rates? Maybe we could get the federal government into the professional sports arena.

  • n4s, BS,  as Sias was having to play with the austerity hand that she was dealt too from state government.  The college cannot print money...and this crap is all Repugnican doings.

     

    ffort2013, September 4, 2014 2:08PM

    "tight wad republicans?  So all of the six figure employees at KSU are republicans and stealing from those kids. My oh my."

    Come'on 2013, I think that you know who I am talking about that is the real problem with cutting millions of dollars in funding...and it ain't a few administrators.  Please!  It is all of this A-U-S-T-E-R-I-T-Y that the Republicans have cut over the years both in the state Legislature and Washington.

    The Democrats like Alison Grime are calling for reinvesting in public higher education systems after all of these years of damaging cuts, which are the product of both the economic downturn (resulting from a deregulated Wall Street nearly tanking the world's economy, and states’ reluctance to raise additional revenues (a Republican Tea Party thingy).   

    According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, in the past five years, state cuts to higher education funding have been severe and almost universal.  After adjusting for inflation:

    -States are spending $2,353 or 28 percent less per student on higher education, nationwide, in the current 2013 fiscal year than they did in 2008, when the recession hit.
     

    -Every state except for North Dakota and Wyoming is spending less per student on higher education than they did prior to the recession.
    -In many states the cuts over the last five years have been remarkably deep.  Eleven states have cut funding by more than one-third per student, and two states — Arizona and New Hampshire — have cut their higher education spending per student in half.

    -Deep state funding cuts have major implications for public colleges and universities.  States (and to a lesser extent localities) provide 53 percent of the revenue that can be used to support instruction at these schools.  When this funding is cut, colleges and universities generally must either cut spending, raise tuition to cover the gap, or both.

     

    That’s what has happened since the recession hit. More specifically, colleges and universities have:

    Increased tuition.  Public colleges and universities across the country have increased tuition to compensate for declining state funding.  Annual published tuition at four-year public colleges has grown by $1,850, or 27 percent, since the 2007-08 school year, after adjusting for inflation.   There has been great variation across the states.  In two states — Arizona and California — published tuition at four-year schools is up more than 70 percent, while other states’ universities and many two-year colleges have held tuition increases closer to the rate of inflation.  Major increases in federal student aid and tax credits, on average, have fallen well short of covering these increases.

    These sharp increases in tuition have accelerated longer-term trends of reducing college affordability and shifting costs from states to students.  The College Board reports that the price of attending a four-year public college or university, even after accounting for increased federal financial aid and tax subsidies, has grown significantly faster than the growth in median income over the last 20 years.


    Cut spending, often in ways that may diminish the quality of education.  Tuition increases have made up only part of the revenue loss resulting from state funding cuts.  Public colleges and universities also have cut faculty positions, eliminated course offerings, closed campuses, shut down computer labs, and reduced library services, among other cuts.  For example, Arizona’s university system cut more than 2,100 positions; merged, consolidated or eliminated 182 colleges, schools, programs and departments; and closed eight extension campuses (local campuses that facilitate distance learning).

    Reversing these trends and reinvesting in higher education should be a high priority for state policymakers.  A large and growing share of future jobs will require college-educated workers.   Investing in higher education to keep tuition low and quality high at public colleges and universities, and to provide financial aid to those students who need it most, would help states to develop the skilled workforce they will need to compete for these jobs."

  • tight wad republicans?  So all of the six figure employees at KSU are republicans and stealing from those kids. My oh my.

  • You are partially correct, Burse is playing the hand that was left by the previous administration (read Sias), not the feds. He is doing a fine job so far. School ain't cheap, and it certainly isn't free. Based on this article, it sounds like KSU bent over backwards to accomodate these students and only dropped them as a last resort.

    I don't recall Republicans paying any of my tuition. Yes the government did help me with tuition as part of my benefit package earned by service in the military. I also busted my arse in Vincent Fisters warehouse and drove a truck for the same company.  I will grant you that tuition was much less then, but so was everything else.

    And you may not want to do it, but we need plumbers and people to clean septic tanks...

  • Black, white or blue, Burse is not a mean old anything, speed.  He is playing the hand he has been dealt by our government that has cut funding for college education to where the brunt is now borne by the students and their families.  Back in the last century when government actually invested in college students (they are our future, BTW), the college tuition was affordable to all.  In the 70's and 80's, KSU's tuition was $125 - $250 a semester.  Now it is well over $10,000.  Why the precipitous jump?  You guessed it, tight wad Republicans don't wanna spend money on anything but wars.

    If you can make as much with a technical 2 year degree as some one with a 4 year degree, then you are the exception, not the norm.  But someone with 4 year degree has a chance to actually be an adminstrator of something, not just a technician.  There is more to college than just hwo much money you can make. Shucks, son, you could have made more as a plumber or cleaning out septic tanks than with a 2 or 4 year degree, but I would not want to do it.

  • Steve..I believe that PitchforkProtester and Obama Fan were one of the same......that being said ...I don't miss either. They were always name calling and nasty to anyone who didn't agree with them. Didn't want to debate.... just mud slinging and name calling.

  • Since Burse is black, it would be inconvenient for Bruno to call him a mean ole administrator, hence the attack on Mitch and the Republicans. I'm quite suire that if it had been a white administrator, the R-bomb would have been  deployed.

    Without a bachelor's degree, many people get stuck in dead-end jobs earning low wages. ..."There is a significant wage premium for having a college degree."... (From the posted CNN Money article)

    Typical eliest claptrap. Many people with 2 year technical degrees earn as much or more than there counterparts with the bachelors degree. Contrary to popular belief, not all people are suited to 4 year programs.

    And, a hitch in the military will pretty much cover your tuition. You don't have to be a rifleman to qualify. There other occupations in the military.

  • BU: "Well, it seems that some on here have chosen monikers that are the exact opposite of the content of their post"

    Speaking of such, wonder where "Obama Fan" and/or pitchforkprotester went?

  • user_38106, September 3, 2014 11:30PM

    "Classic Bruno, ignore that President Burse calls out mismanagement at KSU, blame Mitch McConnell instead, and for good measure do a major copy/paste job."

    Well, I guess then by that same measure that your post is classic 38106, snappy one-liner that ignores the specific content of my post and then disregards the article from a legitimate source that substantiates what I have stated is actually happening to the poor kids trying to go to college in this country.

    Why not just tell me what I have said that is incorrect and why?  Too much readin'n'thinkin' and stuff? 

  • ukfan, September 4, 2014 7:58AM

    "Bruno....are you kidding me.."Proud Conservative"?????.....NO wake up you are having a bad dream....."

    Well, it seems that some on here have chosen monikers that are the exact opposite of the content of their post and I wouldn't want to be out of vogue.

  • Bruno....are you kidding me.."Proud Conservative"?????.....NO wake up you are having a bad dream.....

  • Classic Bruno, ignore that President Burse calls out mismanagement at KSU, blame Mitch McConnell instead, and for good measure do a major copy/paste job.

  • steve_fry, September 3, 2014 10:04PM

    "I think Legend (through several difficult and messy molting phases) went on to be BrunoUno."

    I am thinking about changing it to Proud Conservative...what do'ya think?

  • user_38106, September 3, 2014 5:41PM

    "President Burse has shown his compassionate side, today he's showing his tough side. But, he probably wonders what he's gotten himself into, cleaning up somebody else's mess."

    Yeah, why should Burse have to clean up the Republican's mess?  They are responsible for the collapse of the middle class and the decline in public investment in higher education, which throws much more of the financial burden of college right in the student's lap.  Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and his Republicans have little sympathy for students who have accumulated massive amounts of student debt.  McConnell recently helped kill a proposal by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), which would have enabled millions of Americans to refinance their student loans into cheaper debt by increasing taxes on wealthy households.

    Fact is that if you already live in poverty, which the vast majority (over 90%) of KSU's students do, then your really have a very slim chance of being able ot graduate, primarily for economic reasons.  This has nothing to do with President Sias or her administration...if anything, they were too sympathetic to the plight of most of these students and let them carry too much debt simply because they didn't want to end their chances of getting a degree.  It is a dammed shame really, that the richest country in the world can't afford to invest in these students in order to break the cycle of poverty that they live in.  We surely can spend billions on stupid, needless and futile wars.



    "NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- It's getting more difficult for low-income students to climb the economic ladder as the college
    graduation gap between the rich and poor grows.
    While more students from all backgrounds are finishing college, the difference in graduation rates between the top and
    bottom income groups has widened by nearly 50% over two decades.
    And since education is a key driver of upward mobility, this gulf means that it's even harder for the poor to prosper.
    Some 54% of students from wealthy families obtained bachelor's degrees, said Martha Bailey, an assistant economics
    professor at the University of Michigan. But only 9% of low-income students got college diplomas.
    Bailey recently co-authored a paper looking at students who graduated in the late 1990s and early 2000s and compared
    them to those in college two decades before. She found the wealthy made great gains in graduation rates, while the poor
    only inched up over that time period.
    In the earlier group, 36% of the upper-income children graduated college and 5% of the poor did.
    Part of the reason is because more students from households earning at least $87,000 annually are going onto higher
    education. But children from families making less than $26,000 have not made the same advances, said Bailey.
    5 colleges slashing tuition
    And while two-thirds of freshmen from wealthier households finish, only one-third of their poorer classmates do.
    Other researchers, whose work has found similar discrepancies, have looked into why children from low-income
    backgrounds don't make it through college.
    One reason is the poor often go to lower-tier schools, said Tim Smeeding, the director for the Institute for Research on
    Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. These institutions often have bigger classes and offer less individual
    attention and guidance.
    Also, their parents don't have the financial means to aid their children.
    "We've got a problem in that we get low-income kids to college, but they don't persist to graduation," Smeeding said. "It's
    harder for them to find their way through. They get discouraged and they drop out."
    Failing to get a college degree makes it even harder for these individuals to escape the bottom of the income barrel.
    Some 41% of students who come from families in the lowest income ranks move up to the highest two rungs if they get a
    college degree, according to research from the Pew Economic Mobility Project. But if they don't, only 14% advance that far.
    At the same time, 45% of those without a diploma stay stuck in the lowest tier, while only 16% of their counterparts with a college degree do.
    That's because so many better-paying jobs today require more education and skills that workers can only get in
    college. Without a bachelor's degree, many people get stuck in dead-end jobs earning low wages.
    In fact, a college graduate working full-time for 40 years will earn $1 million more than someone with just a high school
    degree, according to recent Census Bureau data.
    This is why it's increasingly important for policy makers to promote and protect programs that help students, particularly
    those from the lower income rungs, to attend and complete college, experts said. This includes expanding tuition
    assistance for poorer children to give them a better shot at future financial security.
    "The chance for upward mobility from the bottom without a college degree is extremely limited," said Erin Currier, project
    manager at Pew. "There is a significant wage premium for having a college degree."
    KSU isn't the only school having trouble keeping these poor kids from very disadvantaged backgrounds in school long enough to graduate...but it is one of the few schools that caters to this special ed students.  And THAT is commendable, graduation rates be darned! 

     

     

  • I think Legend (through several difficult and messy molting phases) went on to be BrunoUno.

  • From Kentucky.com:

    "We have a lot of broken processes in a lot of places," Burse said in a phone interview Wednesday afternoon. "They were not broken overnight, and it will take a while to fix them, but we will get it done."
    Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/09/03/3409602_kentucky-state-university-dropping.html?sp=/99/322/&rh=1#storylink=cpy

    WOW! As I (and nummerous other posters and The State Journal itself) have been saying on here for a while, KSU has been a complete mess, from financial management, to hiring/firing practices to faculty turnover. There used to be a poster on here called "Legend" who always took up for Dr. Sias and called anyone who challenged what was going on at KSU a racist. I wonder where Legend went? Maybe Legend was Dr. Sias? I wonder what Legend would say about President Burse's frank comments?

     

  • President Burse has shown his compassionate side, today he's showing his tough side. But, he probably wonders what he's gotten himself into, cleaning up somebody else's mess.

  • Tough times call for tough decisions. :o\