Five arrested for drug trafficking in Franklin County

Execution of search warrant finds heroin, cocaine and oxycodone

By Kristina Belcher, Published:

Two former local standout athletes and a former day care employee were among the five people arrested Tuesday in what the sheriff said is the largest heroin seizure he’s heard of in Franklin County.

Dylan Hurst, Kayla Hyatt, Deshawn Barnett and Chanta Whiteford, all 22 and of Frankfort, and Casey Tabor, 19, of Lexington, are lodged in Franklin County Regional Jail, each charged with three counts of first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance and one count of second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton said his office had surveillance on Hurst’s home at 104 Shelby St. as a part of an ongoing investigation. Hurst allegedly lived at the home with Hyatt, who is his fiancée, according to his Facebook page.

Melton said the five were distributing drugs brought to Franklin County from Detroit.

Around 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, a team of three detectives and six deputies executed a search warrant at the home. Inside, they found about 0.75 ounces of heroin, more than 2 ounces of cocaine, several hundred pills and thousands of dollars in cash.

That amount of heroin is enough to supply more than 200 people with a bindle — a tenth of a gram.

The money and drugs were scattered throughout the home, Melton said. Some of the pills and cocaine were hidden in a box made to look like a book.

Sheriff’s officials also said they found three guns — a rifle in the master bedroom, a loaded handgun under the couch where some of the suspects were seated and another loaded handgun hidden in a downstairs toilet.

Detectives said there was a surveillance camera mounted on the front porch, enabling residents to see anyone who approached the home’s front door.

All five suspects inside the home were taken into custody without incident, Melton said.

“We are going to continue to aggressively put drug dealers in jail,” Melton said.

Several of the suspects are well known in the community.

Casey Tabor was a basketball player at Franklin County High School. He was a junior on the 2012 team that went to the final four of the 11th Region tournament — the first time the team had advanced to that level in years.

Dylan Hurst was considered an important asset for the FCHS golf team. As a senior, he shot a 35 in the 2008 Frankfort Cup to tie the current tournament record.

Hyatt is a former employee at New Horizons Child Development Center, the day care at First Christian Church, but current employees confirmed that she hasn’t worked there for several months.

Hurst and Hyatt made the news when they were both involved in a serious car accident in June 2011.

According to police, they were passengers in a car that was hit while attempting to turn left from Rosewood Lane onto Wilkinson Boulevard.

The car’s driver was flown to the University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center in critical condition.

Another passenger was sent to Frankfort Regional Medical Center and later transported to UK.

Hurst and Hyatt were sent to Frankfort Regional Medical Center where they were treated and released.

Deshawn Barnett also made the news in December 2012 when he was involved in a serious motorcycle accident.

Police said he was driving a motorcycle on Louisville Road when a Chevy Trailblazer tried to make a left turn from the Sonic parking lot.

Barnett hit the driver’s side of the SUV and was pinned underneath it.

Witnesses lifted the vehicle off of him, and he was taken to Frankfort Regional Medical Center with a leg injury, cuts and road rash.

Melton said this is the first time his office has dealt with any of the suspects.

“These individuals are making very poor choices,” Melton said. “We’re not going to tolerate it.”

They are each being held on a $40,000 bond.

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  • ffort: "He doesn't enforce domestic violence laws with his own staff, why would he do this for anyone else?"

    Do tell!

  • Homosapien~I really don't have a problem with his office supplementing the other real police agencies like KSP and FPD in county wide patrols looking for DUI's, theft, vandalism, speeders and those who drive recklessly, or responding quickly to domestic violence...you know, those things who pose the most significant threats to our lives, safety and our peace.

    He doesn't enforce domestic violence laws with his own staff, why would he do this for anyone else?

     

  • Bodeen: "This sheriff has made Law enforcing his primary duty do to the contrary."

    That is correct, but it is the type of law enforcement that I object to...a Vice Squad!  This Sheriff has devoted 98% of his office's law enforcement resources to catching penny ante druggies at the expense of all other crime investigations.  This 98% is giving the other 2% a bad name! ;-)

    I really don't have a problem with his office supplementing the other real police agencies like KSP and FPD in county wide patrols looking for DUI's, theft, vandalism, speeders and those who drive recklessly, or responding quickly to domestic violence...you know, those things who pose the most significant threats to our lives, safety and our peace.

    The vast majority of us are not threatened in the least by those who are traveling through the county out on I-64 with small quantities of contrand hidden in their cars.  As long as they are not DUI and posing a moving hazard to the rest of us, I could care less.  The huge quantity of beer cans strewn all along our roadsides in our county is a very good barometer of the scope of DUI's occurring, as well as all of the DUI related accidents and injuries...these are the REAL threats not some people in an appartment smoking dope.

  • Bodeen: "The state journal needs Melton to sell papers and Melton needs the state journal to scare people into voting him in again. It is a nice cozy relationship for both of them.."

    You are absolutely correct.  The way I see it is that The State Journal is merely a cheerleader here, and has no objectivity...copying the police blotter is not objective reporting, which is why I posted:

    "We simply must suspend our value judgments about kinds of drugs and admit (however painful it might be) that a glass of beer on a hot afternoon and the bottle of wine with a fine meal are no different in kind from the joint of marijuana or snort of cocaine; nor is the evening devoted to cocktails essentially different from one devoted to heroin.  All are examples of the same phenomenon: the use of chemical agents to induce alterations in consciousness.  Your value judgments are of no value in determining what is going on in America.  We are spending far too much time, energy and MONEY on trying to find out why people take drugs, but in fact, what we are doing is trying to find out why some people are taking some drugs that we disapprove of.  No useful answers can come out of that sort of inquiry as the question is improperly phrased."

  • Hugh_Heckler, February 1, 2014 2:42PM

    "Gee, homo, if you don't stop taking over these drug stories with your pro-drug rhetoric, people will begin to think you have an agenda."

     

    Hey H_H, thanks for the complete mischaracterization of my position on this...you prove my point that the level of discourse for those who approve of the authorities' Gestapo tactics in cases like this are occurring at a very low intellectual level.  

    Please quote me on just one instance where I have posted "pro-drug rhetoric"...please, just one. Fact is, I am not pro-drug and I defy anyone else to prove otherwise.  I don't take any drugs by choice, but I do not condemn those that do...even alcohol and tobacco.  I know what they are because I tried many of them (well beyond the current statute of limitions) so that I would not have to take the word of our so-called "drug experts" about their effects...experts like the police or other biased sources with true agendas, and serious conflicts of interests.

    My posting of the facts in an attempt to raise the awareness of them and thus dispel the myths and pointing out the hypocrisy of this very expensive and futile chapter of the War on Some Drugs Other Than Alcohol and Tobacco, is not pro-drug, it is pro-truth.  Now, while you may be very comfortable swimming in the cesspool of myths and hypocrisy on which this war is waged by the heavy hand of REALLY BIG GOVERNMENT against the people, those of us who are conscious are not.

  • By the way HS, that East Main incident was just another fishing expedition that this sheriff does to get around the constitution instead of trying to get a warrant which he cannot with so little evidence. This man was followed and The Headlight diversion was all they needed to pull over and search. They didn't find drugs this time but look at how this situation turned out. They **** near got a man killed over some C.I. info that didn't pan out. What next, going up and peeking in peoples windows at nighttime and look for evidence of drugs or crimes, ooops, they already do this and was watched doing it on Rosewood Ave. in the projects. A resident there told me they were looking in several peoples cars and windows. What judge would allow any evidence gotten this way. This isn't police work and this type of fishing for a crime will lead to something very bad happening to the peeker who cannot be identified in the dark if caught by a gun toting tenant. Besides, this practice is illegal! Back to the East main incident, Which deputy was it? The same one that wrecked two cruisers racing to scenes as un-needed backup already taken care of by other agencies.

  • Hsapien, I never commented on the East Main incident and shogun was talking about you and I on this story. It makes no difference which daily addict story that Melton has printed on here, some folks see (and know) the real situation. The state journal needs Melton to sell papers and Melton needs the state journal to scare people into voting him in again. It is a nice cozy relationship for both of them but I honestly think most aren't fooled and want a sheriff that will work with our other police organizations that are more trained and educated in the legal process. All of our past sheriffs has worked hand in hand with state and city police and did not let ego and power of the office get in the way. Heck, this sheriff has used constables as backup in criminal investigations and arrests. Legislative Research Commission has printed a manual of what is expected of every elected official in county government titled DUTIES OF ELECTED COUNTY OFFICIALS.

    124 Powers and Duties of Sheriff
    The sheriff's duties fall into four categories: tax collection, election duties, services to courts, and law enforcement. He spends the majority of his
    time on civil duties, as opposed to his criminal or law enforcement duties. (26 Kentucky Law Journal 52, No. 1 (1963-64), pp. 15-17)

    This sheriff has made Law enforcing his primary duty do to the contrary. He bailed out as a deputy when Steve Clark won the office, Why?

    I haven't never seen a sheriff or any police agency put plain cloth men at a major intersection and run up to all cars stopped at a light to look inside for proof of crime. At first I did not know who these guys were because no police cars were around and only personal vehicles parked in the grass on the side of the road. It freaked my daughter out and she thought a carjacking was about to happen at first. The only sign that they were police were the walky talkies. This sheriff has put a lot of people in danger by his ignorant methods of law enforcement. Look at the infamous Elder Beerman department store takedown. A tip was called in of An actual (rare) drug dealer considered armed and dangerous in the store and instead of allowing him to get in the car and leave the crowded area to make the arrest, they decided it was a good idea to take him out there and risk a shootout with all the innocent shoppers around. Matt Brown, Miguel, etc. many many bad incidents. Since Melton has been in office, he has only gotten less than ten smalltime drug dealers, the rest were addicts nickle and diming to support their own bad habit. At least they weren't robbing and stealing to support it. Melton hasn't slowed or put a dent in drugs and wont because it is a farce to believe what he or any other law agency is doing will work. If anything he has showed that we need to change how we deal with it to really slow it down and help the addicts and the taxpayers who are footing the bill for this waste of time.
     

  • Gee, homo, if you don't stop taking over these drug stories with your pro-drug rhetoric, people will begin to think you have an agenda.

  • These types of murders of confidential informants are happening all over, as Florida payed out $2.6 Million for the wrongful death of 23-year-old informant murdered during what appeared to be a similar drug sting gone bad.

    January 9, 2012  
    "Tallahassee, Florida, city commissioners Friday voted to approve a $2.6 million settlement in the wrongful death suit of a young woman killed in a drug sting when she agreed to be a confidential informant for police after being busted on marijuana and ecstasy charges. The payout comes even as a similar killing is shaking the Detroit area.

    Rachel Hoffman, 23, a recent Florida State University graduate, inhabited student drug circles, but after she was busted and agreed to become a snitch in 2008, Tallahassee police sent her out into an entirely different world. They set up a "buy-bust" sting, giving Hoffman $13,000 in marked bills to buy ecstasy, cocaine, and a gun. Instead of completing the transaction, the two men targeted shot and killed her, stole the money, her credit cards, and her car, and left her body in a ditch. The killers were later caught and are now serving life sentences."

    The city's settlement isn't the only fallout from Hoffman's killing. After her death, her parents lobbied for, and the legislature passed, "Rachel's Law," which mandated reforms to protect informants. Under that law, police who work with informants are also required to get special training, must allow them to talk with an attorney before agreeing to anything, and cannot promise them reduced sentences if they cooperate."  

    Maybe our state could pass Charles Monroe's Law, which would set up similar protections from the Drug War tactics used by the police where they make a deal with civilians who have been arrested for some relatively minor charge, and use it as leverage to coerce them into getting involved in these very dangerous drug stings. Instead of using undercover agents to do it, which is their job, they transfer all of the risk to these untrained and unarmed people who really don't know what they have gotten involved in.

    To this date, the Sheriff and the FPD still employ this dangerous (to the confidential informant) tactic in their War on Some Drugs.  

  • ffort2013: "Maybe you should submit your resume for the next investigative reporter :)"

     

    Thanks, please feel free to comment on the 5% of my post that you disagree with...I am open minded to any thoughful and rational debate...something that is hard to find on here.

    As far as my submitting my resume' to the SJ, I really don't look good in a cheerleader's outfit...those little short pleated skirts are unbecoming on me and my nose doesn't look good with brown stuff all over it (plus, I can't stand the smell!).

    I do know this...Todd Duvall is rolling in his grave right now...

    WWCWD?  

  • HS "Why don't YOU (I am not being sarcastic either)? "

    You write much better than I DO. You have written enough to copy and paste to other sources.  (I guess I could do the same).

    HS "This newspaper has developed more of a cheerleader position with those officials involved in this case...not very reassuring much less ethical.  Who is on this staff who would not wilt under the ire of Melton and Cleveland?"   You think so???? (again being sarcastic)

    Keep writing....I will keep reading.  I agree with your posts 95% of the time. Maybe you should submit your resume for the next investigative reporter :)

  • shogun, January 31, 2014 3:37PM


    "The other day they bashed the sheriff's deputy for pulling over someone for driving w/o their lights on. Fact is it's against the law to drive without lights on after sundown or before sunrise. It's also an indicator the driver may be impaired. Sure we all have probably forgotten to turn our lights on in a well lighted section of town."

    Bodeen, I think that Shogun was talking about the young black man that was pulled over by the Deputy on East Main for not having his lights on and ended up getting tazed and literally running into the side of the police cruiser across the street to try to escape.  

     

    Shogun, you misunderstood my post...nobody was "bashing the sheriff's deputy for pulling over someone for driving without their lights on", as you mischaracterized it. In fact, I WANT the deputies and FPD to stop those (including me and YOU!) who don't have their lights on at night and check us out for DUI!  I have been calling for the Sheriff to take a much more active part in ferreting out DUI drivers in this county, as they the major and very real threat to the vast majority of us who all have to drive and live along side of these highways.

    The problem is that there seems to be a pattern here of the police stopping young black men and then that escalating into an altercation and sometimes tazing, flight and subsequent arrest, when the driver was doing nothing else wrong except driving with their lights off on a very well lit city street.  

    The difference in what happened to this young man and what WOULD happen if YOU were pulled over for the same infraction, is that you would have been given a gentle warning and sent on your way, not being "warned several times" to do some unspecified task and then tazed and arrested. The facts indicate that the young man was not DUI or violating any other law, until the situation became so intolerable that he felt like his only option was to take off running to try to escape the wrath of the unnamed deputy, even if it meant running smack dab into the FPD cruiser.  The difference here is one of apparent bullying and attitude by the officer, which I believe is unnecessary in such cases.

  • ffort2013, January 31, 2014 3:18PM

    "HS-maybe you should ask another media outlet to cover the Monroe case. (I am not being sarcastic-I am serious)"

    Why don't YOU (I am not being sarcastic either)?  

    Actually, I have never officially "asked" the State Journal to cover the Monroe case...I have publicly called upon the Editor to put into practice the Society of Professional Journalists's Code of Ethics, that believes "that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. The duty of the journalist is to further those ends by seeking truth and providing a fair and comprehensive account of events and issues. Conscientious journalists from all media and specialties strive to serve the public with thoroughness and honesty. Professional integrity is the cornerstone of a journalist's credibility. Members of the Society share a dedication to ethical behavior and adopt this code to declare the Society's principles and standards of practice." 

    The following is from its website:

    Seek Truth and
    Report It
    Journalists should be honest, fair and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting information.

    Journalists should:

    — Test the accuracy of information from all sources and exercise care to avoid inadvertent error. Deliberate distortion is never permissible.
    — Diligently seek out subjects of news stories to give them the opportunity to respond to allegations of wrongdoing.
    — Identify sources whenever feasible. The public is entitled to as much information as possible on sources' reliability.
    — Always question sources’ motives before promising anonymity. Clarify conditions attached to any promise made in exchange for information. Keep promises.
    — Make certain that headlines, news teases and promotional material, photos, video, audio, graphics, sound bites and quotations do not misrepresent. They should not oversimplify or highlight incidents out of context.
    — Never distort the content of news photos or video. Image enhancement for technical clarity is always permissible. Label montages and photo illustrations.
    — Avoid misleading re-enactments or staged news events. If re-enactment is necessary to tell a story, label it.
    — Avoid undercover or other surreptitious methods of gathering information except when traditional open methods will not yield information vital to the public. Use of such methods should be explained as part of the story
    — Never plagiarize.
    — Tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience boldly, even when it is unpopular to do so.
    — Examine their own cultural values and avoid imposing those values on others.
    — Avoid stereotyping by race, gender, age, religion, ethnicity, geography, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance or social status.
    — Support the open exchange of views, even views they find repugnant.
    — Give voice to the voiceless; official and unofficial sources of information can be equally valid.
    — Distinguish between advocacy and news reporting. Analysis and commentary should be labeled and not misrepresent fact or context.
    — Distinguish news from advertising and shun hybrids that blur the lines between the two.
    — Recognize a special obligation to ensure that the public's business is conducted in the open and that government records are open to inspection."

     

    Can anybody here honestly say that the State Journal has adhered to this time honored SPJ Code of Ethics that is voluntarily embraced by thousands of writers, editors and other news professionals when it comes to the Charles Monroe/Sheriff Melton case?  Really!

     

    ffort2013, I do not know the Monroe family, Sheriff Melton or the Editor of this newspaper, so I really do not have any more of a 'dog in this fight' than you or anyone else in the community. But I do have a strong moral compass and a keen sense of what is logical, reasonable, right, fair and just, and I know that these things are not always the same as what is legal.

    However, with that being said, I think that the conflicting statements and the troubling time-line evidence, as reported by the State Journal, is enough to warrant a serious journalistic investigation into the actions (and inaction) of the Sheriff before, during and after Charles Monroe was ruthlessly murdered that night in Walmart's parking lot. These ostensibly violated what is logical, reasonable, right, fair and just and may have been in violation of the law as well, as evidenced by court rulings in other states on similar cases where CI's were killed in drug sting operations.  

    There was a man killed here, and his family has been calling upon the deaf ears of both the Sheriff and the usually very chatty, Prosecutor Larry Cleveland, who have apparently adopted a Sargent Schultz like, "I know nothing, I am not here - I did not even get up this morning!" stance.

    As private taxpaying citizens, we could try to conduct an investigation ourselves, but we do not possess the First Amendment guarateed clout of the media, and I feel certain that we would run into stone walls all around...and possible even incur a strong and very personal rebuff from those in question. Judging from everything that I have read on here about this and other cases involving law enforcement (particularly regarding drug related cases)  it would appear that the State Journal does not even have an investigative reporter that is up to the task of asking not only the tough questions, but the essential follow-up questions necessary to get to the bottom of this.  

    This newspaper has developed more of a cheerleader position with those officials involved in this case...not very reassuring much less ethical.  Who is on this staff who would not wilt under the ire of Melton and Cleveland?

  • Shogun If you are gonna criticize other posters then at least get the story right. First, nobody was complaining about being pulled over for not having their headlights on. It was a turn signal bulb blown. Second, that poster and I was only stating how multiple police officers will respond to minor traffic infraction and how they are scared out of their pants thinking everybody is out to kill them and they need to sneak up on all sides of a vehicle with hands on their weapons. Third, I certainly do not defend drug addicts, I am against the law using paramilitatry tactics to invade addicts homes. I think the laws needs changing because in case you haven't noticed, drug use has been flatlined since they started this drug war and their way of doing things aren't helping the addicts or the taxpayers (which I do pay and has paid in all of my 29 years of working) Fourth, We do not need lawbreakers enforcing the law or lawmen who looks the other way when certain others break the law. Fifth, There is no law that says a person cannot visit or associate with a drug addict but in this town the whole house load will be arrested when this sheriff comes barging in and everybody is charged alike (at least he doesn't discriminate). See how this sheriff prejudise these peoples chances of a fair trial. (that is the ones that aren't dismissed for shoddy police work) SIXTH, well lets just say that your uneducated snarky comment at the end of your post says alot about you but by all means TAKE YOUR BALL AND GO HOME IF YOU DO NOT LIKE WHAT OTHERS POST, IT IS STILL A FREE COUNTRY.

    Homosapien, I didn't know that only the non-taxpayers and public assistance folks were the only ones who are suppose to criticize the sheriff. gee, what did those poor folks do to get attacked like that.

     

  • SJ please, please, please limit commenters to one post of 500 words or less per article!!! I am tired of seeing the same old comments where they defend those allegedly caught breaking a law and bashing the ones elected or hired to enforce the laws. The other day they bashed the sheriff's deputy for pulling over someone for driving w/o their lights on. Fact is it's against the law to drive without lights on after sundown or before sunrise. It's also an indicator the driver may be impaired. Sure we all have probably forgotten to turn our lights on in a well lighted section of town. What if that person had been DUI and then ran a red light and killed a carload of teenagers. I guess these people would then bash the police for not stopping them sooner. How about defending 5  22 year olds caught with illegal drugs. Yes that was just casual among friends, right??? 3 hidden loaded guns and surveillance camera on the front porch. They are probably on public assistance and not paying any taxes either. 

  • HS-maybe you should ask another media outlet to cover the Monroe case. (I am not being sarcastic-I am serious)

  • bodeen: "

    "The problem is the smokescreen that he (Melton) has created to make people think he is getting rid of drugs. He isn't cleaning nothing up and never will. It is a whos who that our system actually punishes. If you really want to see drug use slowed down like I would then you realize that the way our system is fighting it is all backwards and wrong. It has been wrong since the day they started this war on certain drugs. Hopefully our leaders will finally admit their mistake and go at it another way that involves not prisons or felonies but more and earlier education and treatment. I lost all respect for this sheriff when a crony and campaign contributor of his was accused of rape but the victim was the one that was investigated and treated horrible and of course charges were dropped. He allowed a rouge deputy to threaten and shake people down for whatever he could get from them. (no wonder this deputy only worked the drug beat)."  

    What about the "no comment due to an ongoing investigation" "smoke screen" laid down by the Sheriff and Prosector regarding the death of Charles Monroe?  The investigation was over a long time ago, like a year and a half!  Why should we the people tolerate that kind of official behavior from elected officials? What were the "poor choices" made by the individuals in the Sheriff's Office that ostensibly lead to Monroe's death?

    Monroe was evidently a confidential informant for the Sheriff who was murdered nearly 2 years ago in Walmart's parking lot under very suspicious and unexplained circumstances during a drug sting gone bad.  The case has yet to go to trial (to the dismay of Judge Shepherd) and NONE of the questions that the Monroe family asked about why Monroe's body lay on the side of the road while all of the Sheriff's horses and all the Sheriff's men ran off to Owenton after his murderers. 

    In fact, the Sheriff and prosecutor refused to reveal anything substantive about their deal with Monroe at the time of the incident, May 2012, or thereafter, claiming that it was an "ongoing investigation". Well, it no longer is an ongoing investigation.  The SJ newspaper has neglected to ask for answers to the questions that were asked by them or the family....why is that?  Everyone seems to be pretending that it never even happened.  But we have this dead man who left a loving family and two daughters and they deserve answers, as does the community who pay the salaries of those officials.  


    Based on the facts that were released at the time of the incident, we can make several logical deductions. The Sheriff's Office apparently made a deal with Mr. Monroe, who had obviously been previously arrested (his mug mug shot printed in SJ) for some relatively minor charge, and then used it as leverage to coerce him into getting involved as a confidential informant in this very dangerous drug sting in which he was killed.  This is a very common practice in police investigations of drug related cases and there is little reason to believe that it was not the case here.

    Evidently, the Sheriff's Office used Mr. Monroe to set up a drug transaction with 3 known thug druggies from Owenton, KY, when something unexpected happened like the hoodlums may have found out that he was wired and thus a confidential informant.  They killed Mr. Monroe by strangulation (gangland style) in their car and drove to the I-64E on-ramp where they dumped his stripped body beside the road to the horror of his friend who was following their car as it sped out of the Walmart parking lot. Mr. Monroe's body laid on the side of the on-ramp until the next morning even though it was reported to the Sheriff as it happened by that "family friend".  All 3 of the banditos were in custody by the next morning even though they were from out of town...apparently because the Sheriff knew who they were and was observing from afar as the whole thing went down.


    How do we know that Charles Monroe was a CI for the Sheriff's Office? Well, that is an elementary deduction, because if Charles wasn't at the scene of the murder after being coerced into making a deal with the Sheriff to do the sting, and if the Sheriff wasn't close by watching this whole thing go down, how did the Sheriff's Office even know that these bad guys had committed a crime?  If they didn't know that they had committed a crime, then why did the Sheriff's Office race off en masse to Owenton that night in hot pursuit to arrest these guys when the Sheriff said in this newspaper that he did not even know about the call reporting a body being dumped until the next morning?  They hadn't even bothered to look at Monroe's body where it had been tossed out of the car on I-64, so how did the Sheriff even know that a crime had been committed if he wasn't in on it?  It is the only possible scenario that makes any sense...

    It appears that the Sheriff's Office knows a whole lot more about this incident than they are letting on, and that our "award winning newspaper" is willing to investigate what the Sheriff knew and when did he know it.    

    If I knew someone named Charles who had been accused of a crime, like say he had been accused of molesting a child of a former jilted and scorned girlfriend, and then I used that information to coerce and extort Charles into committing a more serious and very risky crime against some bad guys who I had a vendetta against, and in the commission of that crime Charles was killed, then I would be guilty of being an accessory to manslaughter and extortion.  Why should the law be any different for me that it would be for the Sheriff based on our employer and job classification?

     

  • Thank you in your every day effort to clean up this town.

    The problem is the smokescreen that he has created to make people think he is getting rid of drugs. He isn't cleaning nothing up and never will. It is a whos who that our system actually punishes. Even our prosecutor admitted  that it is a farce to think they will get rid of drugs.

    user 39037 this is all our sheriff consentrates on and by him putting every drug arrest he makes in the paper and on the news he has created the belief that this town is over ran with dealers and it isn't.  If you really want to see drug use slowed down like I would then you realize that the way our system is fighting it is all backwards and wrong. It has been wrong since the day they started this war on certain drugs. Hopefully our leaders will finally admit their mistake and go at it another way that involves not prisons or felonies but more and earlier education and treatment. I lost all respect for this sheriff when a crony and campaign contributor of his was accused of rape but the victim was the one that was investigated and treated horrible and of course charges were dropped. Evidently all a woman has to do is say yes once when she is drugged & it gives the man a lifetime approval even after the drugs wears off and she says no. He allowed a rouge deputy to threaten and shake people down for whatever he could get from them. ( no wonder this deputy only worked the drug beat)Then all the other petty crap that he allowed his deputies to do to try to get tickets wrote. Hopefully people will calm down when a different sheriff gets in that isn't a media hound that has every news station within a 100 miles on speed dial to mug in front of... Until people are tired and demand a different approach in fighting a medical and psychological problem then it will never get better and more and more of our taxes will go to punish sick people when it could be used better in dealing with it in a way that will work.

  • Thank you in your every day effort to clean up this town....

  • bodeen: "Once again the two most dangerous drugs are overlooked because they are legal."

    While the health impacts of alcohol and tobacco dwarf all illegal drugs combined, including drug related homicide, the negative health impacts of antibiotics and steriods in farm animals used for food dwarfs them...and it effects everyone of us, even Sheriff Melton everytime he eats a Big Mac. 

     

    "An increase in fatal drug-resistant infections in the United States can be traced to the over-use of antibiotics, especially in agriculture, say public health scientists.

    "There is a global public health problem of antibiotic resistance," says Fred Angulo, a public health scientist with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    The threat of untreatable infections is growing in hospitals, communities generally and on the farm, he says. "We need to use these drugs more prudently wherever they are used to slow the progression of resistance."

    Antibiotics, introduced more than 50 years ago, have saved countless lives worldwide.

    Before the development of these drugs, death through bacterial infections in even minor wounds was a frightening possibility in this country. Now, because of resistance to antibiotics, once- treatable infections again are becoming fatal.

    More than 90 percent of strains of Staphyloccous aureus bacteria, a common cause of hospital "Staph" infections, are now resistant to penicillin, according to Angulo."

    Here are some excepts from a New York Times article:

    "The numbers released quietly by the federal government were alarming. A ferocious germ resistant to many types of antibiotics had increased tenfold on chicken breasts, the most commonly eaten meat on the nation’s dinner tables.

    But instead of a learning from a broad national inquiry into a troubling trend, scientists said they were stymied by a lack of the most basic element of research: solid data.

    Eighty percent of the antibiotics sold in the United States goes to chicken, pigs, cows and other animals that people eat, yet producers of meat and poultry are not required to report how they use the drugs — which ones, on what types of animal, and in what quantities. This dearth of information makes it difficult to document the precise relationship between routine antibiotic use in animals and antibiotic-resistant infections in people, scientists say.

    Medical researhers contend that there is already overwhelming epidemiological evidence linking the two, something that even the Food and Drug Administration has acknowledged, and that further study, while useful for science, is not essential for decision making. “At some point the available science can be used in making policy decisions,” said Gail Hansen, an epidemiologist who works for Pew Charitable Trusts, which advocates against overuse of antibiotics.

    Antibiotics are considered the crown jewels of modern medicine. They have transformed health by stopping infections since they went into broad use after World War II. But many scientists say that their effectiveness is being eroded by indiscriminate use, both to treat infections in people and to encourage growth in chickens, turkeys, cows and pigs.

    Whatever the cause, resistant bacteria pose significant public health risks. Routine infections once treated with penicillin pills now require hospitalizations and intravenous drip antibiotics, said Cecilia Di Pentima, director of clinical services at the Infectious Diseases Division at Vanderbilt University’s Department of Pediatrics. Infections from such strains of bacteria are believed to cause thousands of deaths a year.

    “The single biggest problem we face in infectious disease today is the rapid growth of resistance to antibiotics,” said Glenn Morris, director of the Emerging Pathogens Institute at the University of Florida. “Human use contributes to that, but use in animals clearly has a part too.”

    The Food and Drug Administration has tried in fits and starts to regulate the use of antibiotics in animals sold for food. Most recently it restricted the use of cephalosporins in animals — the most common antibiotics prescribed to treat pneumonia, strep throat and urinary tract infections in people.

    But advocates say the agency is afraid to use its authority. In 1977, the F.D.A. announced that it would begin banning some agricultural uses of antibiotics. The House and Senate appropriations committees — dominated by agricultural interests — passed resolutions against any such bans, and the agency retreated. 

    Regulators say it is difficult even to check for compliance with existing rules. They have to look for the residue of misused or banned drugs in samples of meat from slaughterhouses and grocery stores, rather than directly monitoring use of antibiotics on farms. “We have all these producers saying, ‘Yes, of course we are following the law,’ but we have no way to verify that,” said Dr. Hansen, of Pew Charitable Trusts."

    Now, tell me how dangerous that heroin is again, and why the Sheriff should be expending nearly all of his law enforcement resources trying to stop its use in an extremely small percentage of our society (0.0003% of Kentuckians died from heroin related poisoning in 2012)?

  • ihate: "Some people are to stupid to argue with 355....dont waste your breath or they will steal it..."

    Nice self-admission...

  • Some people are to stupid to argue with 355....dont waste your breath or they will steal it...

  • Once again the two most dangerous drugs are overlooked because they are legal. Being legal doesn't make them any safer than the heroin that people are doggin these young people over. All Homosapien is saying is that this shouldn't be treated any different than any other drugs and that the police shouldn't be the ones dealing with this problem and I absolutely agree. Heroin is one nasty drug but the cigarettes that I am addicted to is even nastier in my opinion. Alcohol has killed and destroyed more families and harmed more innocent people than heroin will ever do. Let me ask all you posters here a question. HOW MANY OF THESE SMALL AMOUNT OF HEROIN ADDICTS/DEALERS HAS HARMED OR THREATEN TO HARM YOU OR A MEMBER OF YOUR FAMILY? NOW THEN, HOW MANY OF YOU ALL HAVE SEEN A FAMILY MEMBER DIE OF CANCER OR KNOW OF SOMEONE WHOS FAMILY HAS BEEN DESTROYED BECAUSE OF ALCOHOL. Does people think that anybody dying or is injured cares what drug it was that caused it.

    This war and the reason these drugs are illegal to start with has been going on long enough and this lunacy of police acting like addicts are members of al qaeda needs to stop! I am far more worried about a skittish cop who is trained nowaday to stop any and all threats no matter how imaginary they are. I will guarantee you all that these cops went into that place with weapons drawn and ready to shoot at the slightest movement. I have seen the same action on a female neighbor of my parents who didn't own any weapons. I will also guarantee everybody that I do not use, sell or hang around anybody that does and never been charged with any crime from this sheriff. I have seen his deputys in action and wasn't impressed with the two that I seen. I also had plain clothes deputys run up to my car at a stop light to peek inside my car for whatever they could possibly charge me with which I think should be illegal or at least a practice that should not be condoned. I am sure the sheriff can find better use of his deputys than that. This sheriff isn't gonna stop people from using drugs no matter how many arrests he makes but eventually some innocent bystander will be harmed by the military tactics that are used in fighting a medical problem. At least he gets free advertising.

  • need4speed, January 30, 2014 10:03AM

    "Massive bloviation from Homer as usual...nothing to see here."

    Speak 4 yourself, N4S.  Everything that is posted here is from several posts in another very similar thread that N4S has obvious seen before...but not everybody has seen it before, which is obvious in capitalcitizen's case.  

    The fact remains that N4S has never been capable of logically deconstructing anything I posted here, so if is is just bloviation, why hasn't he torn it up?  He can't.

    Some people are on here just to throw platitude bombs and some are on here to educate and speak truth to power.  Guess which one N4S is....hint it is the one who never posts more than 2 sentences and is filled with an ad hominem attack.  Typical Republican response...criticize without ever offering a substantive rebuttal OR an alternative.  Hey, I am not the one needing to do speed!  Sigh.

  • capitalcitizen: " I am not sure if you are an addict yourself, looking for some justificaiton and reasoning for legalizing drugs and avoiding jail time, or simply a ticked off dealer who has served jail time, but heroin is no laughing matter."

    Look, I didn't insult you about how ignorant you sounded in your post, so I would appreciate it if you didn't accuse me of being a drug addict or a ticked off drug dealer who has served jail time.  I mean really, I am the one who is citing stats and you are the one frothing at the mouth...and I am somehow the one who is HIGH?

  • Massive bloviation from Homer as usual...nothing to see here.

  • 355, slavery and Jim Crow used to be legal, my friend.

    capitalcitizen, those are your opinions, but where are the facts that back any of it up?  I call BS on most everything that you have said (conventional wisdom should not be what we base public policy upon)...the facts simply do not back your contentions up.  I have studied this...have you?

    Heroin kills whom?  Where are all of the bodies around here?  Who has died from a heroin overdose in Franklin County during the last decade?  The Sheriff says there were 8 to 10 people who died last year in Franklin County from heroin...which was it, 8 or 10?  Was it 9?  Where is the cornfusion here, either they died or they didn't!  And how did somebody die here from a heroin overdose and it NOT end up on the front page of this newspaper...have you seen what passes for front page news around here lately?  Where did the Sheriff get those numbers?

    These "drug dealers" around here are small time druggies trying to self medicate their pre-existing emotional problems and support their addictions by selling some small amounts to their friends.  The laws and penalties of heroin possession and sale are draconian already, and seem to offer little if any deterrent to those few seriously ill folks who use it...as evidenced by their continued use.  It is clear that the current 50+ year old policies have failed miserably...so you suggest that we justDOUBLE DOWN ON THEM AND HOPE FOR A DIFFERENT OUTCOME!

    That is certifiably insane.  So, who are really the sick people here?

    In Kentucky there were 1004 accidental drug poisonings in 2012 due to drug injury of any intent (unintentional, suicide, homicide, or undetermined), including those folks under a doctors care. Because of their aforementioned drug biases (where alcohol and tobacco are not even considered drugs), the authorities and media are trying to make the case that the growing abuse of prescription pills is totally due to illicit sales, and therefore, we must continue to implement the failed policies of the disastrous Drug War at an expense of over $50 Billion per year.  

    The spin that they put on this is that all of this "carnage" is due to illicit painkiller (opiate) abuse which is not what the data is actually indicating--that accidental poisonings is from ALL prescription drugs (not just pain meds), including those used under doctors care and anethesia related complications in hospitals.  That is like saying that ALL residential home fires are the result of arson, so we must pour billions of our tax dollars into stopping arsonists.

    The fact is that Kentucky is second in the nation (only behind Tennessee) with 15.4 retail drug prescriptions per person, so is it any wonder that we have so many accidental drug poisonings since our doctors make sure that we are so heavily medicated?

    http://www.statemaster.com/graph/hea_ret_rx_dru_per_cap-retail-rx-drugs-per-capita

    According to the 2012 Overdose Fatality Report issued jointly by the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy and the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, of the 1,004 overdose fatalities in Kentucky in 2012, 888 were found to be unintentional, while 59 were labeled suicides and 57 were undetermined.  Out of this 1004 overdose deaths, only 143 were related to heroin...a 'SCOURGE' that does not make, in spite of the use of pumped up percentages of increase that are purposely devoid of context.  The total 143 heroin overdoses in a state of 4,380,415 = 0.003% of the population is effected...a 'SCOURGE' that does not make.

    scourge (skûrj) n. 1. A source of widespread dreadful affliction and devastation such as that caused by pestilence or war. 2. A means of inflicting severe suffering affecting or tending to affect a disproportionately large number of individuals within a population, community, or region at the same time."

    hy·per·bo·le (h -pûr b -l ) NOUN: A figure of speech in which exaggeration is used for emphasis or effect.

    When this issue is being hyped to you in this manner, what "effect" are those authorities and media types who are perpetuating it trying to achieve? FEAR!

    This heroin thingy is gagging on the gnat and swallowing the camel (whole)!

    "Smoking kills Kentuckians at the highest rate in America, a federal report released yesterday says.

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report looked at smoking-related deaths in each state, and ranked Kentucky highest, with 371 deaths per 100,000 people age 35 or older -- or 7,848 people a year (compared to 143 heroin overdoses, some of which are surely intentional suicides).

    The national median was 263 deaths per 100,000.

    "It's no surprise," said Irene Centers, program manager for tobacco prevention and cessation for the state. "Kentucky has the highest percentage of lung cancer deaths. We have the highest rate of adult smoking in the nation."

    A 2007 federal survey showed that 28.2 percent of Kentucky adults smoked, and Kentucky also has some of the nation's highest smoking rates among youths and pregnant women. The CDC estimates that the total annual cost of smoking in Kentucky is more than $3.6 billion."

    Now that is scary!  

    What Ron & Rand Paul says...legalization is the truly cvonservative thing to do.  Really BIG government is still REALLY BIG government intrusion into adult's lives, even if it is the DEA. 

    In 2001 Portugal became the first European country to officially abolish all criminal penalties for personal possession of drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine.

    At the recommendation of a national commission charged with addressing Portugal's drug problem, jail time was replaced with the offer of therapy. The argument was that the fear of prison drives addicts underground and that incarceration is more expensive than treatment — so why not give drug addicts health services instead? Under Portugal's new regime, people found guilty of possessing small amounts of drugs are sent to a panel consisting of a psychologist, social worker and legal adviser for appropriate treatment (which may be refused without criminal punishment), instead of jail.

    The question is, does the new policy work? At the time, critics in the poor, socially conservative and largely Catholic nation said decriminalizing drug possession would open the country to "drug tourists" and exacerbate Portugal's drug problem; the country had some of the highest levels of hard-drug use in Europe. But the recently released results of a report commissioned by the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank, suggest otherwise.

    The paper, published by Cato in April, found that in the five years after personal possession was decriminalized, illegal drug use among teens in Portugal declined and rates of new HIV infections caused by sharing of dirty needles dropped, while the number of people seeking treatment for drug addiction more than doubled.

    "Judging by every metric, decriminalization in Portugal has been a resounding success," says Glenn Greenwald, an attorney, author and fluent Portuguese speaker, who conducted the research. "It has enabled the Portuguese government to manage and control the drug problem far better than virtually every other Western country does."

    Compared to the European Union and the U.S., Portugal's drug use numbers are impressive. Following decriminalization, Portugal had the lowest rate of lifetime marijuana use in people over 15 in the E.U.: 10%. The most comparable figure in America is in people over 12: 39.8%. Proportionally, more Americans have used cocaine than Portuguese have used marijuana."

    We simply can't afford this madness of putting adults into jail for ingesting something that certainly is less harmful than alcohol and tobacco, and that may not be good for them.  It costs around $40,000 per prisoner, per year to incarcerate a non-violent drug offender and that is only a direct cost. The indirect cost of throwing non-violent drug offenders in prison include taking care of their dependents while the primary provider is in jail (read: welfare); taking care of the non-violent drug offender who is now a felon once released when they cannot get a job; taking care of their dependents of the non-violent drug offender felon while the primary income maker cannot secure gainful employement once released with a felony record (say it LOUD! welfare!); re-arresting and re-convicting said felon once they become a criminal (violent?) after they have been unable to earn a living because cannot get said job; repeat...over and over for 50 years.

    Those are just some of the facts...there are a lot more.  Now, capitalcit, try to reconcile all of your hyperbole with the facts and then get back to us...this ought to be good! 

  • Homosapien, you are truly out of touch with reality.

    Heroin kills.  It is the kind of drug that causes great harm to one's physical and psychological self. I am not sure if you are an addict yourself, looking for some justificaiton and reasoning for legalizing drugs and avoiding jail time, or simply a ticked off dealer who has served jail time, but heroin is no laughing matter.

    Heroin use and heroin dealing are not faulty judgements.  The use of heroin is dangerous; dealing heroin is akin to handing a loaded gun to a person with suicidal tendancies.

    Dealing heroin is a serious crime that leads to further crime. Families are ruined over the use of drugs.  Children are neglected and abused because they have junkies for parents.  People rob and kill for drugs, Homosapien.  You are an idiot, sadly, who wants to defend drug dealers.

    Sadly, drug trafficking has become the second largest employer in Frankfort.

     

    PS....these are young people who could have chosen to further their education and sadly have wasted their talents.  They look wasted, lost, and worthless, sadly. Worthless because drugs have enabled them to give up on having a good life.

  • Hmmm...beer (legal), wine (legal), Marlboro (legal), sex (legal).......marijuana (illegal), cocaine (illegal), heroin (illegal).   That my friend, is the difference!

  • These are mug shots, not professional portraits...and you can tell by their expressions that they don't want to be there in jail.

    We simply must suspend our value judgments about kinds of drugs and admit (however painful it might be) that a glass of beer on a hot afternoon and the bottle of wine with a fine meal are no different in kind from the joint of marijuana or snort of cocaine or a Marlboro after dinner or sex; nor is the evening devoted to cocktails essentially different from one devoted to heroin.  All are examples of the same phenomenon: the use of chemical agents to induce alterations in consciousness.  These faulty value judgments are of no benefit in determining what is going on in America.  We are spending far too much time, energy and MONEY on trying to find out why people take drugs, but in fact, what we are doing is trying to find out why some people are taking some drugs that we disapprove of.  No useful answers can come out of that sort of inquiry; the question is improperly phrased."

  • Dang, that's a rough looking crew!