Suspect in Bluegrass Inn shooting turns himself in

Frankfort Police aren't releasing motive yet

By Kristina Belcher, Published:

The suspect accused of shooting a man inside a Frankfort hotel room Saturday has turned himself in to police. But a possible motive for the shooting is still unknown.

Frankfort Police Maj. Rob Richardson said Christopher McGowan, 27, came to the Public Safety Building with his attorney, Ted Shouse, just before 11 a.m.

He was then arrested on a charge of second-degree assault.

Richardson said officers responded to Frankfort Regional Medical Center just past 11 p.m. Saturday, after Alonzo Scott, 37, of Frankfort, came in with a gunshot wound.

Scott said he was staying at the Bluegrass Inn on Versailles Road when someone entered his room and began assaulting him. Scott was shot in the head sometime during that assault.

Scott drove himself to the hospital. His injuries were not life-threatening, Richardson said.

Richardson said Scott later identified McGowan as the man who shot him. 

Police still are not releasing a possible motive for the crime.

McGowan is currently lodged in the Franklin County Regional Jail on a $25,000 full cash bond.

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  • Well I see he made bail. Now we have a man who on the streets who follows his own laws and dispenses justice however he feels..A man who when upset, will barge in other peoples residences and assault them with whatever he gets his hands on, even guns.  I am sure that conditions were placed on his bond but this man has proven that he doesn't obey the laws so the conditions are just writings on a paper as the laws are. This is what I was saying about dangerous people being let out over non-dangerous. To the poster that said I do not know the whole story, Thats true but I do know that based on what was said, this man is responsible for causing this shooting in the head incident that very well could had been a murder had the bullet been a fraction off from where it hit.  In situations like this, no bond should be given till a judge has listen to the whole story.

  • steve_fry, February 28, 2014 10:50AM

    "Job descriptions coming from a shapeless, name-changing, anonymous internet poster. THERE'S a dangerous road to travel."

    Job descriptions coming from : 

    http://sand-kas-ten.org/ijm/Chapter_1.pdf

    For the record, I have never changed my name and everyone on here (including you) is anonymous.  I could call my self Steve Fry if I wanted to, but would I be you?  I did not design this web site or make it anonymous, the State Journal did.  I assume they had a reason...other than to make it a dangerous road to travel.  

    And besides, what is in a name on a completely anonymous forum? It doesn't make what you or I say any more of less valid.  Why not try to address what I am saying and leave the attempts to discredit me personally as a shapeless whatever you said...but then I have challenged you to do that before and you've never been able to pull it off.  This is just your common way of misdirecting rather than addressing...it is so par for the course.  Can't think of anything better to say?

  • Job descriptions coming from a shapeless, name-changing, anonymous internet poster. THERE'S a dangerous road to travel.

  • steve_fry, February 26, 2014 7:42PM

    "Of course there isn't "enough information to solve the crime." We don't solve 'em, we just report them. That's what REPORTers do."

    Taking the easy road of copying down what is on the police blotter may be all that some reporters do, but that is not all that investigative journalists do...far from it.  

    The stuff that Kristiina does cannot be counted as investigative journalism any more than simply relaying a simple ‘bite’ of information – “A cattle fair will be held in X village next 
    month”.  Investigative journalists expose issues or topics that is in the public interest.  "‘Public interest’ means that either a community will be disadvantaged by not knowing this information, or will benefit (either materially or through informed decision-making) by knowing it."

    "Although an investigative story can start with a tip, simply reporting the tip, or printing the secret document that is anonymously faxed through to you, is not investigative journalism. In fact, doing such a thing may be both lazy and careless. It carries huge risks, since you have not investigated the identity, bona fides or motives of your source or the authenticity of the evidence. You may end up defaming someone, printing lies or being framed by somebody’s agents. Instead, you must develop hypotheses about what the tip means and plan additional research, decide on the relevant questions, and go out to ask them. You must see evidence, and hear and analyse answers for yourself, and go beyond simply verifying the tip."

    This stuff is all foreign to our crime beat reporter.  She has never heard of a follow-up question. She and the State Journal act more like cheerleaders that investigative reporters.

    “Investigative reporting is simply good reporting. This definition comes out of the traditional view of journalists as ‘watchdogs’, whose mission is to sniff out wrongs, point fingers at those to blame, and report in a way that brings about change. And that is certainly part of our role. 
    When reporters are successful in their efforts, life may genuinely get better, and public appreciation of the importance of a free press is strengthened. But reporters are not the only watchdogs today; they function alongside a range of civil society organisations, some (such as Transparency International) explicitly tasked with keeping an eye on power and sniffing out wrongs. Investigative reporting uncovers secrets somebody wants to keep hidden." 

    Stuff like what was Sheriff Melton's involvement in setting up the drug sting in Walmart's parking lot that resulted in the murder of his apparent confidential informant, Charles Monroe?   If you will remember Mr. Monore was brutally murdered on May 5, 2012, by 2 or 3 men in their vehicle in Walmart's parking lot in what the Sheriff calls a "drug deal gone bad". It is unclear from the authorities' most recent public statements whether David Bruce was actually in the vehicle at the time of the murder. It appears that the Sheriff's Office knows more about this drug deal prior to the actual murder than they are letting on. Let's all just pretend that that didn't happen, MmmKay?

    That's what REPORTers do, my friend.

    All together now:  Two bits, four bits, six bits a dollar, all for Sheriff Melton stand up and holler!  YEEEEEHHH!

  • Of course there isn't "enough information to solve the crime." We don't solve 'em, we just report them. That's what REPORTers do.

  • 571075. "The first article was nothing more than an incident report and it was not intended to provide the public with enough information to solve the crime. The reporter merely reported the info given by the police."

    I got news for ya' pal, that is all that this "reporter" ever does...copy the police blotter.  Get used to it.  You'd think that her editor would catch some of these...there still isn't "enough information to solve the crime."  Far from it and you haven't put a dent in it yet either.

  • I know how it all workss. As far as I am concerned, it doesn't matter if the shooter didn't intend on shooting the victim. He did. He went there to confront and created this situation. Had he not been where he did not belong or break a law to get where he was at where it happened then he is ultimately responsible. Here is the thing user_571075, I know this is a onesided story but enough info is given to show that this man is responsible for what happened. I've heard what he was there for and what it was over. Still, he isn't to take laws (none broken) into his own hands. Even if the victim was the one who brandish the gun, he is the one who had legal a right to defend himself in his home or wherever he is paying to sleep. This man should had stayed home, now look at him.

    As far as the heroin bail, like I said, no courts really follow the law in determining bails. Bail is also to be based on what the accused reasonal ability to pay is. not on who they know that may be a lot wealthier. These two cases aside, I see time and again where none violent and victimless crimes has exessive bails and crimes of violence with victims are nowheres near as harsh. At the end of the day, If jails are over crowded then I would hope that the dangerous criminals are the ones who are kept locked up.

  • Bodeen: Maybe the judge figured the person dealing heroin had access to more money and if someone posted bail it needed to be significant to make him appear in court. We don't know all the details of the other case and that is something that shouldn't be tried in the local paper. Maybe he had no intention of shooting Mr. Scott. Maybe they wrestled and the gun accidentally went off. Maybe it wasn't even his gun. The first article was nothing more than an incident report and it was not intended to provide the public with enough information to solve the crime.

    Legion: Someone as learned as you should be able to answer those questions by reading the article. Mr. Scott realized he had been shot and drove himself to the hospital. He was not very forthcoming to the police so he may be embarrassed about the details of the case. Maybe the other guy realized he had not been shot and he ran away. The reporter merely reported the info given by the police.

  • steve_fry, February 25, 2014 2:29PM

    "BEHOLD THE POWER OF THE PRESS! As a State-Journal employee, I'm firmly convinced it was Kristina's top-notch reporting skills and this newspaper's fierce, unyielding commitment to justice that brought this young man to turn himself in. (/tongue-in-cheek)"

    I think that the report was so cornfusing and clumsily worded that McGowan couldn't take it any longer and had to come in to obtain protective custody.  At least the big questions are now known...

    Which man realized he had been shot?

     Who had the gun and who did the shooting?

    But how was the man who was shot able to get himself free to drive to the hospital?

  • Neither of these instances should it be an amount where a fee could actually be paid
     Actually, Bail should be only sufficient enough to assure that a person attends court to face charges. Section 17 of the Kentucky Constitution prohibits excessive bail. No courts really adheres to it though. 25,000 and 50,000 dollars are not within most peoples reach so I would say those two people will be in jail till a judge decides their case.

    It is in my opinion, rediculous to set bail at 25,000 for a man who shot another man in the head and 50,000 for a man who had drugs on him. I am of the opinion that a man who points a gun at another mans head and pulls the trigger is far more dangerous than a man who has drugs in his home. Heroin is bad but at least the user is only harming himself or at worse selling it to another man who is willing to do the same thing.. Those bails should be reversed but this is how the system is.

     

  • Im sorry, but how is he just on a $25000 full cash bond when someone arrested with heroin is on $50000. Neither of these instances should it be an amount where a fee could actually be paid.

  • BEHOLD THE POWER OF THE PRESS! As a State-Journal employee, I'm firmly convinced it was Kristina's top-notch reporting skills and this newspaper's fierce, unyielding commitment to justice that brought this young man to turn himself in. (/tongue-in-cheek)