Bad baby sitters: Couple allegedly gets high, passes out while driving with infant

Couple now in Franklin County Regional Jail.

By Kristina Belcher, Published:

A couple is in jail after they allegedly got high and passed out driving down the road — while an infant they were baby-sitting sat in the back seat.

Paul Rearden, 28, is charged with first-degree criminal abuse of a child under 12, first-degree wanton endangerment, operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs and first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

His wife, Christie Rearden, 27, is charged with first-degree criminal abuse of a child under 12, first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance and public intoxication.

Sheriff Pat Melton said a passerby noticed Paul Rearden slumped over the steering wheel of his vehicle around 3 p.m. Monday. The vehicle was allegedly stopped in the middle of St. Clair Street, right in front of the Franklin County Courthouse. Melton said Christie Rearden was passed out in the passenger seat.

The passerby went inside to get a court security deputy, Melton said.

When the deputy came outside, he allegedly found Paul Rearden passed out with his foot on the brake. He regained consciousness when the deputy banged on his window. Melton said that was when Rearden took his foot off the brake, causing the vehicle to begin rolling.

The driver’s door was allegedly locked, but Rearden eventually rolled down the window, allowing the deputy to unlock and open the door, then put the vehicle into park.

An infant boy — who was less than 1 year old — was in the back seat throughout the incident, Melton said. 

The couple was allegedly baby-sitting the boy. They were on their way to pick up the baby’s sibling, Melton said, whom they were supposed to baby-sit, too.

The infant was taken by child protective services, and then later picked up by his grandmother, Melton said.

During a search of the vehicle, authorities said they found 47 Percocet pills.

Paul Rearden is being held on more than $30,000 full cash bond.

Christie Rearden’s bond is currently set at $20,100 full cash.

Both are lodged in the Franklin County Regional Jail.

Want to leave your comments?

Sign in or Register to comment.

  • Bodeen, "Lets stick to the illegal drugs or the legal tobacco or alcohol."

    Why, the government stats on accidental prescription drug poisonings do not discriminate, so why should we?  My point wasn't that people were "abusing" these prescription drugs, whatever abusing means in popular culture.  I am talking about the detrimental health impacts and mortality rates of prescription drugs that are ALL part of the government stats on accidental drug poisoning. When these stats are quoted they don't tell us that they include ALL drug deaths INCLUDING those from many of those listed in the top 10 that I listed below...leaving us to assume that they were just from pain meds abuse, which we readily do since that is what we want to hear to justify why we disaprove of them.

    Just taking many of these top 10 drugs as prescribed is abusing the body, and they are all part of our REAL drug problem, all illegalites aside. Do you ever listen to those ads on TV where BIG Pharm is hawking them directly to the consumer?  Stuff like steroids for "low T"...its just a number!  Half of the ads are taken up by disclosing the awful side effects (by law) while they continue to show older men being really active and virile with younger women.  Now YOU may not call this "abuse" but I do.

    This country is awash in dangerous drugs with horrendous side effects and it is the peak of hypocrisy to single out pain meds because we disapprove of them since they are chemical agents that induce alterations in consciousness.  Australia got the convicts, Canada got the French and we got the Puritans and their rabid anti-pleasure attitudes that are still deeply ingrained into our society today.

    We simply must suspend our value judgments about kinds of drugs and admit (however painful it might be) that a glass of beer on a hot afternoon and the bottle of wine with a fine meal are no different in kind from the joint of marijuana or snort of cocaine or a Marlboro after a good meal; nor is the evening devoted to cocktails essentially different from one devoted to heroin.  All are examples of the same phenomenon: the use of chemical agents to induce alterations in consciousness.  These faulty value judgments are of no benefit in determining what is going on in America.  We are spending far too much time, energy and MONEY on trying to find out why people take drugs, but in fact, what we are doing is trying to find out why some people are taking some drugs that we disapprove of.  No useful answers can come out of that sort of inquiry as the question is improperly phrased.

  • BrunoUno how many people you know are abusing Lipitor, Nexium, Plavix, Advair Diskus, Abilify, Seroquel, Singulair, Crestor, Actos, Epogen? Any of them getting these on the blackmarket? police aren't kicking in doors of folks who takes these drugs, YET! Lets stick to the illegal drugs or the legal tobacco or alcohol.

    ukfan we had ADHD medicine back then but it wasn't what doctors prescribed. It was more effective however. It was called a paddle, belt, switch. Ah, the good ole days when fear of getting a zebra stipe across your backside was all that was needed to keep ya in line. Never even heard of a school shooting but the one that happened on a college campus in texas that was so unheard of they made a movie out of it called The Deadly Tower. Most shootings before that were either accidents or estrange lovers of teachers. There wasn't any students going on killing sprees like we have nowadays.

  • I believe that these kids that are going on these killing sprees at schools are a result of doctors over prescribing antidepressants and ADHD medicines. When I was in school we never had any of these school shootings. It has only been lately since the drug companies have pushed doctors to prescribe them that these horrors have occurred. Most all the doctors have a vested interest in these drug companies and so they have no problem prescribing them to the max.

  • Bodeen, April 10, 2014 10:27AM

    "BrunoUno at the time I made that comment I said that I would sound contradicting but that is the way I feel. It wasn't really directed at marijuana. First, Doctors got too careless in prescribing a medicine that they probably really never understood its dangers fully. I think that the pharmaceutical companies should be gone after like the tobacco companies were and MAKE THEM PAY STATES FOR TREATING THE ADDICTS THEY ALLOWED TO BE CREATED BY HIDING THE REAL DANGERS FROM THEIR STUDIES AND TRIALS!" 

     

    Shucks man, contrary to popular mythogy, the real dangers to public health are not coming from overly prescribed pain killers...shucks they aren't even in the top 10!  Kentucky ranks third, behind the states of West Virginia and New Mexico in per-capita drug overdose mortality rates, as should be no surprise since our state is second in the most prescriptions per capita at 16.2 for each and every one of us.  And that is not just pain meds, which actually comprises only a small percentage of the total prescriptions filled, but includes the top 10 selling drugs overly prescribed by doctors state wide.  Do you ever read the safety data sheets that come with your prescription meds for all of the side effects, many of which may cause "death"? How many of you are taking drugs in the followig list of the best sellers?

    The 10 Best-Selling Drugs
    The drugs on which we spend the most money are those that are still new enough to be protected against generic competition.
    The IMS reports that Americans spent $307 billion on prescription drugs in 2010. The 10 drugs on which we spent the most were:
    Lipitor, a cholesterol-lowering statin drug -- $7.2 billion
    Nexium, an antacid drug -- $6.3 billion
    Plavix, a blood thinner -- $6.1 billion
    Advair Diskus, an asthma inhaler -- $4.7 billion
    Abilify, an antipsychotic drug -- $4.6 billion
    Seroquel, an antipsychotic drug -- $4.4 billion
    Singulair, an oral asthma drug -- $4.1 billion
    Crestor, a cholesterol-lowering statin drug -- $3.8 billion
    Actos, a diabetes drug -- $3.5 billion
    Epogen, an injectable anemia drug -- $3.3 billion

     

    When I hear of anyone currently taking a statin drug such as Zocor or Lipitor, I cringe knowing that they are completely unaware of the dangerous side effects of these drugs and the simple means of reversing the problem of plaque forming on the inside of our arteries through orthomolecular nutrition.

    Julian Whitaker’s excellent Health & Healing newsletter focuses specifically on the real horrors of taking "cholesterol-lowering" statin drugs. Whitaker claims that over 12 million Americans are prescribed a statin drug with the most common side effect being muscle pain and weakness. But the second most common side effect is rarely discussed in the literature, and not listed in the package insert of any of the commonly prescribed statin drugs. It is known as "transient global amnesia (TGA)"—the sudden and temporary loss of memory.

    But that is just the tip of the iceberg...read the fine print that comes with the prescription!  It makes any illegal drug pale by comparison!  And that is just one of the top ten.

    We are choking on the gnat and swallowing the camel!

  • BrunoUno at the time I made that comment I said that I would sound contradicting but that is the way I feel. It wasn't really directed at marijuana. First, Doctors got too careless in prescribing a medicine that they probably really never understood its dangers fully. I think that the pharmaceutical companies should be gone after like the tobacco companies were and MAKE THEM PAY STATES FOR TREATING THE ADDICTS THEY ALLOWED TO BE CREATED BY HIDING THE REAL DANGERS FROM THEIR STUDIES AND TRIALS! That would be a start. I will sound contradicting when I say the government shouldn't interfere with patient/doctor decissions of treatment but at the same time I am glad they went after doctors who were obviously prescribing to make money and not for legitimate needs. Now look at the folks who suffers daily because they cannot get the right medicine to treat painful diseases or age related conditions. They are the ones paying a dear price because of the way our government attacked this problem. The addicts are paying a huge price also in their attempt to find an alternate drug that they found in heroin.

    We need to get the leglislators out of this war and we need to get the legal system out of it and our government needs to appoint a committe of respected doctors, psychologists, educators and come up with a different way to fix this problem. We will never fix it fully but I do think get it more manageable to free up the legal system and law enforcement operations. It can be done but they got to take that first step. Decriminalize marijuana and treat it like alcohol in the way it would be allowed to be consumed. Maybe that first drug a person tries will be this and be enough. Contrary to what a lot of folks say, marijuana is not a gateway drug. It just isn't, I know. Very rarely does the law catch a person with both marijuana and other drugs. unless it is a dealer and not person who sells to their circle of friends to support a habit which wouldn't be a great amount anyhow. I do agree that the vast majority of arrests around here of drugs are merely circles of friends who sell among eachother and not actual pushers. All the law is doing is fining the one that can pay and allowing lesser punishment for another TRICK, so to speak. Keeping the cycle going.

  • bodeen: "Basically saying that I cant stand a person who preys on the weak and that I can see why an addict will needs to buy but a seller is taking advantage of an addiction for profit. I see that as being disgusting!"

    But that really isn't what is going on here for the vast majority of these arrests, is it?  What we see around here is druggies selling part of their stash to fund their own needs.  There has never been a drug kingpin arrested, much less convicted around here.  Which by using the 5-second Abominable Snowman, Lochness Monster rules, means that there are none around here.  If there was, you'd think that one would turn up somewhere...dead or alive.  But NOOOO!  It is the stuff of myths and hyperbole in these parts.

  • Brunono I said then that I know I sound contradicting in my views. Keep in mind that I wasn't refering to marijuana when I said that. Basically saying that I cant stand a person who preys on the weak and that I can see why an addict will needs to buy but a seller is taking advantage of an addiction for profit. I see that as being disgusting!

  • Bodeen, you say that illegal drugs should be decriminalized (which I totally agree with), and see nothing wrong with the private use of drugs by adults.  But you also state that you are steadfastly against "drug dealers".

    Well then, how the heck are folks supposed to get their drugs if it isn't from the black market and drug dealers?  Wait for the Drug Fairy to put some under their pillow at night?  Or maybe old Saint Nick will bring them some at Christmas...if they are really good.  The fact is that if it weren't for the local independent small business drug dealers, folks would not be able to buy any illicit drugs for their personal consumption.  Your position seems inconsistent.

     

    Bodeen, April 9, 2014 9:36AM

    "My question to all of you readers is How many true dealers has been caught and arrested and convicted here. How many REAL DEALERS? " 

    The obvious answer it that their never has been a true drug dealer caught and arrested and convicted here. They have all been small time low hanging fruit that sell some of what they use to pay for their own.  All of them.  Prove me wrong people...name just one!  

  • commonsense61 where do you think the judge is going to put them? Most of the inmates are in for contempt charges. Gotta pay the man or do the time. The second most inmates are in for NONE VIOLENT OFFENCES and so on. How about all you folks that want to jail none violent people take up a collection and build another jail add-on. I am not taking up for these two but simply saying that priorities of who we need to lockup needs changing.

  • I want to give the passerby a big thank you.  When others just passed these idiots thankfully someone got help.  Hopefully the little one will not remember this awful situation.  My fear is the court will dismiss charges and let these people go or a slap on the head.  I ask that everyone start reading the Court News you will see the court dismissing shoplifters, harrassment charges, and on an on and on!!  The judges must take some of the blame!

  • Ooops. My question to all of you readers is How many true dealers has been caught and arrested and convicted here. How many REAL DEALERS?  A real dealer is not a user but in it to make huge profits. They prey on the weak addicts for personal gain. Those are the people that that our law enforcers need to go after if they really want to make a dent. The answer can be counted on one hand! All we are doing is keeping a fresh supply of addicts going before the courts to get their fines, probation or if they are broke, jail time. That is all we are doing folks. Nobody is going after the real problem. Nobody is trying to get these people help. This drug court is a farce. The prosecutor done said that they only pick offenders who they think has a chance to pass it so it is stacked in their favor for a high success rate. Let me tell you all something, if an addict has no money and most don't, then they are not allowed drug court. They have to pay, pay, pay the whole time they are in it. It is a farce and does nothing but provide jobs and money to those who oversee the requirements of offenders. I do not have all the answers but I do know we are just fooling ourselves if we think that keeping a revolving door in the legal system turning is progress. I have seen what happens when one hits rock bottom. Very few actually gets help because there is no help. They are forced to commit more crimes to pay fines to stay out of jail which some think is the answer or they overdose and die. Who cares! Just another lowly addict off the street, Right? Thats the way we look at it. Throw them in jail and deal with them later, and we will, We all have failed in educating our youths of the dangers of all drug use, tobacco and alcohol too! We need to do more than have a cop talk to kids telling them drugs are bad, drugs are dangerous. If it takes shocking the point home to the kids then so be it, load em up on buses and take them to the morgue and show them the real consequences of drug use. Show films like what these two above did with a baby! We haven't stopped or slowed this drug war down since we started it and I am all for doing something different and quit this circus act. Aren't you all tired of it also.

  • We put this problem in the laws hand and they are the ones that deal with it. Who is going to deal with it if we take it out of their hands? We got laws in place to deal with people like these two but we shouldn't allow a situation like this to happen to start with. A child or two very well could have died. They were so stupid (or high) that they got lucky, very lucky! Just as alcohol drinkers will leave the safety of their homes and put others at risk, some drug users do the same. BrunoUno you understand this from the point that I try to make and that is we do not need to criminalize drug use across the board and quit making criminals out of addicts. If addicts gets out of the privacy of their homes and or put others at risk then they, like alcoholics or drunkards  do, they need punished. Real drug dealers are given C.I. status to set up their own buyers in order to swap out a bigger problem for a smaller one. Most users/addicts/dealers around here are all the same. They are in groups that help eachother out to support their own addiction. An addict may be a buyer all week long, then maybe for a day or two out of the month, become a seller (dealer) to help their friend and theirselves. What I am trying to say is most of these nickle/dime addicts and dealers are all the same. When one is caught they will set up a member of their inner circle who is not different than them. My question to all of you readers is

  • LSD, April 8, 2014 5:11PM

    "Bodeen- I worked as a counselor for MANY years in the drug/alcohol field. What YOU never seem to understand is that it IS a mental disease- which means that until faced with their own personal rock bottom many addicts lack the desire to actively participate in, and complete, life changing rehabilitation programs." 

    And I guess that as a drug counselor for all of those years that you never really learned what you were dealing with, huh?

    Drugs don't destroy people's lives any more than guns kill people. Drugs don't destroy you. YOU destroy you. Guns don't kill people. PEOPLE kill people.

    The fact is that there are no "bad" drugs or good drugs, as drugs, like food, are neutral. There are no "addictive" drugs (or foods), there are just people with emotional problems who are self-medicating, most of whom are clinically depressed.  In fact, folks get "addicted" to things where there are no externally induced chemicals involved at all...like gambling or sex.

    There are differences in toxicity of drugs, so the side effects do vary with some being much harder on the body. Alcohol and tobacco are particularly damaging to the body since they cause a breakdown at the cellular level. However, our drug laws are not based on relative toxicity and disease, but rather on myth and political "realities", or else both alcohol and tobacco would have been banned long ago.

    The fact is that MOST people who use these same "addictive" drugs recreationally NEVER develop an unhealthy relationship with them. It is one thing to use a drug (like taking a little vacation) and totally another to abuse a drug (living there full time). The difference is the presence of emotional problems of the user, not the "addictive" properties of the substance.

    The drug war is based on myths like these, where perfectly 'normal' and innocent folks come into contact with the "evil" substance and slide down this slippery slope into addiction. This myth takes personal responsibilty completely out of the equation and is perpetuated by ignorant politicians, cops and practitioners like YOU alike.  This profound logical error by those who obviously have no personal experience with the effects of the substances in question, explains why the success rates of traditional threapy programs (like the 12 step) is so dismal.

    It is just so much easier and simpler to blame an addiction on a substance than to deal with the psychological reasons that the addict is abusing it.  Drug abuse is always a medical problem and never a legal one. The legal system is just the wrong tool for the job.

    That is why our simplistic legal approach and governmental policies are geared towards eradiction of the drug sources, dealers, etc., and not in fixing the emotional pain that is causing the addicts to need to self-medicate all the time. Nobody needs to escape from happiness.  It is much more complex to think about addiction as a symptom of the problem, which is probably why most folks like capitalcitize and YOU or the Editor and Sheriff just don't get it.

    It is time that we admit and acknowledge that the so-called drug addicts have serious emotional issues from their childhood that caused them to want to stay messed-up all the time. We are stuck on the comfortable mythology that if they can just stay away from the substances, that everything will be OK. Most personal accounts of addicts (or obese people) blame the drugs only, instead of the admission that the problems lie within themselves. The same myths lure obese people to have their stomachs stapled, only to realize that even though they are skinny, the underlying problems still exist and that their lives are even more screwed up afterwards.

    We are spending far too much time, energy and MONEY on trying to find out why people take drugs, but in fact, what we are doing is trying to find out why some people are taking some drugs that we disapprove of.  No useful answers can come out of that sort of inquiry as the question is improperly phrased.
     

  • capitalcitizen, April 8, 2014 12:26PM

    "Some of the better known regular posters:  please state your case on this behavior.

    Please do not tell me that illegal drug use is not law enforcement's or the public's business." 

    Mmmkay, drug use per se is not law enforcement's or the public's business.  DUI IS law enforcement's and the public's business.  Endangering a child while DUI IS law enforcement's and the public's business. You just can't get it, can ya?  Don't have a clue when it comes to nuance, do ya'?  How many times and ways do I have to try to splain it to ya'?  Fifth graders...

  • LJD I do understand and people like these do nee to be punished. Nobody is going to be able to help until the addict wants it. Try to follow me here. Jail does nothing at all to help an addict. Fining does nothing but encourage an addict to commit crimes to pay fines. Expensive habits does the same. Merely suspending ones ability to use while they are in jail will do nothing towards helping either side. They're two groups that I am talking about but in the end, addiction is addiction and wether one is able to maintain a habit without commiting crimes or if one has to commit crimes to substain a habit, (different drugs causes different problems), not all has to be treated as criminals by the mere fact they have an addiction. Alcoholics aren't having their doors kicked in because society accepts a deadly drug that is cheap. My point all along is all drugs are bad but not all drug users need be treated as criminal till they do something like this or causes harm to others. How many times have you seen where an addict was jailed just to be released and overdose? Happens all the time but nobody cares. The greater the punishment, the further one is pushed to do something dangerous. Only some people that hits what you call "rock bottom" actually gets help. Until they get serious with fighting a problem then we are p!ss!n in the wind. I don't think a lot of people realizes that jails and fines increases problems and encourages crimes. Jail or Death doesn't have to be the only options for an addict nore should it. How many more decades will it take to do something different. LJD, Thanks for your polite response.

  • Bodeen- I worked as a counselor for MANY years in the drug/alcohol field. What YOU never seem to understand is that it IS a mental disease- which means that until faced with their own personal rock bottom many addicts lack the desire to actively participate in, and complete, life changing rehabilitation programs. Rehab is NOT a 30 or 90 day "cure all"- many, many people who go through court ordered rehab DO re-offend, and every time they make the choice to not stay clean they endanger the lives of others. Fact is, you have to WANT sobriety for yourself in order for it to be successful. Taking all of these violators and giving them a slap on the wrist, a reduce sentence in exchange for completeing drug court, or a free pass to a cut rate rehab program is not going to change their behaviors- but I have seen MANY, MANY instances where a sunstantial amount of jail time gave the addict the motivation they needed to get clean and stay clean. Sometimes Jail IS the rock bottom these people need in order to be receptive to rehab. 

  • capitalcitizen "The recidivism rate for drug offenders is high"

    You haven't figured that one out yet have you. Let me tell you why. It is because addiction is a medical problem, not criminal. It leads people to commit crimes but until society realizes that it costs more money to jail than to rehab then the revolving door keeps on spinning. Your idea of suspending their addictional use by locking them up is the way to deal with it then keep on living in your fairytale world. You done said that you think they are INCAPABLE of learning but your answer is to jail instead of helping the root cause. Don't kid yourself or use babies to justify your harsh views.

  • capitalcitizen the regular posters you are talking about never condones this. You for only reasons known by you, want to twist comments to suit yourself or take completly out of contex what the comments are. The one thing you constantly overlook is the fact that it is always said that what a person does in their OWN HOME and doesn't HARM OR PUT ANYBODY IN DANGER shouldn't be bothered. Just as some are responsible with drinking, some aren't. I have never condone drug use but think all should be treated the same. How can tobacco or alcohol be accepted and marijuana criminalized? When it comes to mind altering drugs, or drugs that impairs the most, alcohol tops them all and I will let the record of its dangers speak for itself. These dweebs above deserves whatever punishment the judge gives them for putting a baby in harms way and after that, they need help, REAL HELP that prisons and jails are not suited to give. After all, they basically begged for attention and turned theirselves in. Now, I do not see how you can twist what I said to mean that nothing is wrong with what these two did but I am sure you will. You always do!

  • Some of the better known regular posters:  please state your case on this behavior.

    Please do not tell me that illegal drug use is not law enforcement's or the public's business.  A child was put in harm's way because people, allegedly intoxicated on drugs, made poor judgements and chose to drive under the influence, with a baby in the backseat.

     

    And, please, judges:  please do not feel so sorry for people who do not value the lives of children.  I am so darn tired of hearing that this one or that one was given probation on drug charges.  If there is evidence that results in a conviction or a guilty plea, please do not let these crooks and addicts off scot-free.  The recidivism rate for drug offenders is high.  I am not sure that letting them off easy once or twice is going to make a hill of a beans of effort towards deterring crime.  

    Gone are my liberal sensibilities when it comes to drugs and people dealing drugs.  I don't feel that most of these people are capable of learning from the error of their ways, so it's bset to lock them up and keep society (and children) safe from them.