Former FCHS assistant coach arrested on drug charges

Gordon Miles, 31, has been released on his own recognizance

State Journal staff report, Published:

An assistant coach for Franklin County High School’s football team during the 2013 season is now facing drug charges, but few details are being released in the case.

According to his citation, deputies with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office arrested Gordon Miles at his home Thursday and charged him with trafficking in marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

FCHS Athletic Director Tracy Spickard confirmed Tuesday afternoon that Miles is not a part of the current year's coaching staff.

A Franklin District judge released the 31-year-old Thursday on his own recognizance, jail records show.

Sheriff Pat Melton and prosecutors have declined to comment on the case.

The citation states that deputies executed a search warrant at Miles’ home, 113 Baltrussol, and found about 4 pounds of marijuana, along with two sets of digital scales.

His next court appearance is scheduled for Aug. 26.

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  • g_w: "Wow! I didn't realize we had that much influence on what they print."

    Of course you (collectively) do! You don't think I print this paper for ME, do you? If a story gets lots of page views, why SURE it stays up near the top. Each click "earns" us an infinitesimal amount of money. (Not near enough to live on, but every little bit helps.)

  • @Steve_fry

    Wow! I didn't realize we had that much influence on what they print.

  • g_w: "But what about the SJ putting this guy, Miles, picture in the paper so much?"

    At least partially because you/we keep talking about it.

  • @bruno:

    “Um, sorry, that didn't make a lick of sense, did it?  What I meant to say was:

     

    This Sheriff's fixation on this subject seems excessive, and this newspaper's complicity in his endeavors by consistently making small time possession of marijuana a front page headline 2 -3 times a week also seems excessive...and amounts to little more than cheerleading.” 

    Now that's a statement I can mostly agree with. But, it must be what the majority of the voters in Franklin County want because it would seem he is going to be re-elected to another term. And what good politician (oximoron) would pass up free publicity?

    But what about the SJ putting this guy, Miles, picture in the paper so much? Everytime I logon here his picture is at the top of the page.

  • gayle_woods, August 14, 2014 9:00AM

    "I know what he means. For instance if I consistantently wrote speeding tickets to people I caught speeding that would be seem excessive. If I wash my hands five times a day, that would seem excessive."

    Naw, you don't have any idea what I mean, even though I keep saying it over and over and...

    What I said was that the Sheriff's policy of enforcing a very tiny segment of the laws on the books (only illicit drug laws) at the expense of not enforcing all others, that is excessive! That means that relative to threats of all other laws including violent crimes, that the threat that marijuana poses to society is nil, yet Sheriff Melton is obsessed with ferreting out even casual users and arresting folks that have only small amounts (like a "bud") in their own homes at great expense (most of the $1.8 MILLION of his budget).  And the fact that he uses GESTAPO tactics in his home drug raids and coercion of motorists to obtain permission to search when NO probable cause exists is NOT "his job", but it is very very excessive!  

    The War on Some Drugs has eroded our 4th Amendment rights and has turned our police into a paramilitary force that wages war against the very people that they are sworn to serve and protect.  THAT IS OBSESSIVE!  THAT IS OBSCENE!

    I welcome the Sheriff to write speeding tickets and to patrol the county for DUIs and throwing the book at them, because these idiots are a very real threat to us all.  You can't even walk to your own mailbox without rear of some drunk or drugged maniac running you or your kids down!

    Somehow I just don't get the same heebie-jeebies when I read about young McGaughey having a bud and a baggie with residue in his home...and then being frog-marched out of the jail house to the delight of the State Journal which had a photog there to capture it all for the front page headline story!  That is excessive.  Do I need to go on...cuz I can?

    I wash my hands 15 -20 times a day and that is NOT excessive.

    There was a time when the law said that black people were slaves and women were property. Was the law right?  Not hardly, and it took the Civil War to undo what was legal but very wrong indeed. Hopefully it will not take a civil war to stop the drug war, but I ain't so sure after watching just how out of control these police officers have gotten in Ferguson, MO.

  • monkeydoodoodle, August 14, 2014 1:30AM

    "BrunoUno, what is that you don't understand - It is ILLEGAL!! Just like anything else that is illegal, stealing, robbery, shoplifting etc."

    I think that I understand it just fine, but you seem to be having a problem with the nuances of this issue...possession or even sales of marijuana are no where near "just like...stealing, robbery, shoplifting" because those things hurt other people and besides, ever heard of "Thou shalt not steal"?  Yeah, 2 of your "just like anything else" examples are violations of one of the Ten Commandents! Ever heard of Thou shalt not possess marijuana?  No! Why is that? Because it was a contrived law that was codified by white men in order to control black and brown people who used the drug, and particularly black men and any ideas that they had on having sex with white women, because the white men felt sexually inferior. Marijuana prohibition was racist from the start...and not much has changed.

    "Harry Anslinger, the father of the war on weed, fully embraced racism as a tool to demonize marijuana. As the first commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, a predecessor to the Drug Enforcement Administration, Anslinger institutionalized his belief that pot's "effect on the degenerate races" made its prohibition a top priority. Here are just a few of his most famous (and most racist) quotes:

    "There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the U.S., and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing result from marijuana use. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others. Reefer makes darkies think they're as good as white men."

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/14/marijuana-prohibition-racist_n_4590190.html

  • steve_fry, August 14, 2014 7:49AM

    "Bruno: "by consistently seems excessive"

    Um, what?"

    Um, sorry, that didn't make a lick of sense, did it?  What I meant to say was:

    This Sheriff's fixation on this subject seems excessive, and this newspaper's complicity in his endeavors by consistently making small time possession of marijuana a front page headline 2 -3 times a week also seems excessive...and amounts to little more than cheerleading. 

  • steve_fry

    August 14, 2014 7:49AM

    Bruno: "by consistently seems excessive"

    Um, what?

    I know what he means. For instance if I consistantently wrote speeding tickets to people I caught speeding that would be seem excessive. If I wash my hands five times a day, that would seem excessive. 

    My issues with the Sheriff is not that he is targeting people for breaking the law, that is what he is supposed to do. My complaining is in his methods. But that is all this is just me complaining in this public forum to see if any others feel as I. That in a nut shell is as far as I care to go. If he breaks the law in his efforts to enforce the law it will catch up with him sooner or later. It may also cost us taxpayers in law suit settlements just like it did with Hunter Hay.

    Yes, I could run for Sheriff in an effort to unseat him and run the office the way I want. That is not something I care to do.You have to go out begging for money to pay for your advertising and trinkets to give out to people, feed people you don't even know, smile alot, shake a lot of hands, kiss a lot of butt, agree with people even when you know they are completely crazy, and make a lot of unrealistic promises.  But until enough people are unhappy with his operation of the office this is what we have.

  • Steve you get it. Our sheriff spends most of his time and our resources on his obsession with what is basically victimless crimes. The power has literally gone to his head but the thing that I find ironic is out of all their so called training, none of his deputies are able to use a rope to go down a hill. They only practice shooting human targets.

    I am surprized that nobody finds anything wrong with using men untrained in law enforcement to go cut down somebodys marijuana patch of this size. Thankfully the grower didn't have any sophisticated booby traps that could had harmed or killed the firemen. All of you folks preaching about marijuana beeing illegal, so is adultery but we do not see the police fighting that crime or anybody getting charged. Chew on it!

  • monkey: "Move to Colorado if you want it legal"

    Alternately, stay where you are and try to change the law. I, too, believe that pot is relatively harmless, and that penalties for its use and possession are vastly disproportionate to other, MUCH more harmful (sometimes fatal!) substances. (Cigarettes have already killed me once.)

    I'd like to see marijuana decriminalized, relieving pressure on the court system AND the penal system, and allowing police to focus on more egregious crimes.

  • Bruno: "by consistently seems excessive"

    Um, what?

  • BrunoUno, what is that you don't understand - It is ILLEGAL!! Just like anything else that is illegal, stealing, robbery, shoplifting etc.  Move to Colorado if you want it legal but in Kentucky it is against the law.  Law Enforcement take an oath to uphold the law and they are only do their job. The only people that can help you out and have it legal are legislators go give them the sermon.

  • This Sheriff's fixation on this subject seems excessive, and this newspaper's complicity in his endeavors by consistently seems excessive.  Basically, the Sheriff is a one trick pony whose single issue policy of combing the landscape for casual drug users is at the expense of investigating and thwarting real crimes.

    My job here is to bring attention to this extremely expensive and futile fixation and the hypocricy, insanity, expense and pointlessness of this War on Some Drugs.  I am committed to exposing disproportionate arrest rates and the systems that perpetuate them. It is certainly not the only thing that I call attention to, as the REAL gayle_woods would know...why don't you?

    As America's war machine goes, the War on Some Drugs, as was labeled by Richard Nixon, is a lie. It is simply a war on people, and has had the most dire effect on people of color, whether inside the borders of the U.S, or as a part of destabilizing military interventions in other countries. The U.S. War on Some Drugs has been waged overwhelmingly against black Americans.

    Although rates of drug use and selling are comparable across racial lines, people of color are far more likely to be stopped, searched, arrested, prosecuted, convicted and incarcerated for drug law violations than are whites. Higher arrest and incarceration rates for African Americans and Latinos are not reflective of increased prevalence of drug use or sales in these communities, but rather of a law enforcement focus on urban areas, on lower-income communities and on communities of color as well as inequitable treatment by the criminal justice system. The mass criminalization of people of color, particularly young African American men, is as profound a system of racial control as the Jim Crow laws were in this country until the mid-1960s.

    The War on Some Drugs is costing more lives, destroying more families, and quickly becoming a scourge on the soul of American society. In the past 40 years, the War on Some Drugs has accounted for 45 million arrests, made America the world's largest jailer, and destroyed impoverished communities at home and abroad. Who do you think is footing the bill for all of thse incarcerations?  YOU and your tax dollars.  Yet drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available today than ever.

    The War on Some Drugs is an abject failure.  The 3 top causes of preventable deaths in this county have to do with the legal drugs tobacco, sugar and alcohol, not illicit drug use.  

    And on and on...

  • If I knew what those issues were I would have announced them. Your fixation on the subject seems excessive.

    The war on drugs is really a war on people. Yes people who use drugs, correct. So?

    The war on drugs is built on racial injustice. Is your point that whites are better at not getting caught than blacks or latinos? I believe it's more a choice of priorities.

    A drug offense will also get you and your entire family kicked out of public housing. Thirty-two states ban anyone convicted of a drug felony from collecting food stamps. Good it should be all 50. I don't want my tax dollars going to support some crack-heads habit by giving him public housing and free food.

    And on and on......

  • 10 Ways the Drug War Is Causing Massive Collateral Damage to Our Society

     
     
    January 3, 2013  |  

    "The war on drugs is America’s longest war. It has been 40-plus years since Nixon launched our modern “war on drugs” and yet drugs are as plentiful as ever. While the idea that we can have a “drug-free society” is laughable, the disastrous consequences of our drug war are dead serious. While it might not be obvious, the war on drugs touches and destroys so many of the issues we care about and the values we hold. Below are 10 collateral consequences of the drug war and reasons we need to find an exit strategy from this unwinnable war.

    1. Racial Injustice

    The war on drugs is built on racial injustice. Despite roughly equal rates of drug use and sales, African-American men are arrested at 13 times the rate of white men on drug charges in the U.S. -- with rates of up to 57 times in some states. African Americans and Latinos together make up 29 percent of the total U.S. population, but more than 75 percent of drug law violators in state and federal prisons.

    2. Denied Access to Education, Housing and Benefits

    Passed by Congress in 1998, the Higher Education Act delays or denies federal financial aid to anyone ever convicted of a felony or misdemeanor drug offense, including marijuana possession. A drug offense will also get you and your entire family kicked out of public housing. Thirty-two states ban anyone convicted of a drug felony from collecting food stamps.

    3. Wasted Taxpayer Dollars

    U.S. federal, state, and local governments now spend $50 billion per year trying to make America “drug free.” State prison budgets top spending on public colleges and universities. The prison industrial complex is ever more powerful. Nevertheless, heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine and other illicit drugs are cheaper, purer and easier to get than ever before.

    4. Unsafe Neighborhoods

    Most “drug-related” violence stems not from drug use, but from drug prohibition. That was true in Chicago under alcohol kingpin Al Capone and it is true now. The mass killings in Mexico and in many U.S. cities are not from marijuana or other drug use, but because the plants are worth more than gold and people are willing to kill each other over the profits to be made.  

    5. Shredded Constitutional Rights

    Armed with paramilitary gear, police break into homes unannounced, terrorizing innocent and guilty alike. Prosecutors seize private property without due process. Citizens convicted of felony offenses lose their right to vote, in some states for life. More and more Americans are subject to urine tests without cause. And the list goes on.

    6. Bloodbath in Latin America

    U.S. drug policies in Latin America have failed to reduce the supply of illicit drugs. Instead our policies have led to a bloodbath with more than 60,000 people killed in prohibition violence since 2006 in Mexico alone. Our policy and strategies have empowered organized criminals, corrupted governments, stimulated violence, assaulted the environment and created tens of thousands of refugees.

    7. Compromising Teenagers’ Safety

    The defenders of the failed war on drugs say that we can't discuss alternatives to prohibition because it would "send the wrong message to the kids." Ironically, the drug war is a complete failure when it comes to keeping young people from using drugs. Despite decades of DARE programs with the simplistic “Just Say No” message, 50 percent of teenagers will try marijuana before they graduate and 75 percent will drink alcohol. Young people also feel the brunt of marijuana enforcement and make up the majority of arrests. Arresting young people will often cause more damage than drug use itself. Teenagers need honest drug education to help them make responsible decisions. Safety should be the number-one priority.

    8. Drug Treatment

    Despite the government’s lip service to the need for treatment, most of the drug war budget still goes to criminal justice and military agencies. The majority of those who need treatment can’t get it. And for many, the only way to get treatment is to get arrested. We should never put people in a cage because they have a drug problem, and we should make treatment available to all who want it.

    9. Public Health

    Unsterile syringe sharing is associated with hundreds of thousands of HIV/AIDS infections in the U.S. among injection drug users, their sex partners and their children. Yet state paraphernalia and prescription laws limit access to sterile syringes in pharmacies, and the U.S. government stands alone among Western industrialized nations in refusing to fund needle exchange.

    10. Destroyed Families

    The number of people behind bars on drug charges in the U.S. has ballooned from 50,000 in 1980 to more than half a million today. That’s more than all of Western Europe (with a bigger population) incarcerates for everything. Millions of people in the U.S. now have a father, mother, brother, sister, son or daughter behind bars on a drug charge.

    Momentum Builds to End Drug War

    The war on drugs is really a war on people. It is hard to imagine an issue that has caused so much damage to so many people on so many fronts. Thankfully, momentum is building in this country and abroad toward a more rational drug policy based on science, compassion, health and human rights. States like Colorado and Washington just dealt a blow to marijuana prohibition by legalizing marijuana. World leaders, including multiple presidents in Latin America are calling for open debate on alternatives to drug prohibition. Many countries in Europe have implemented public health strategies like safe injection facilities and prescribing medical heroin to reduce HIV/AIDS and overdose deaths. Both red and blue states are reducing their prison populations by offering alternatives to jail for low-level drug offenses.

    Everyone has a reason to oppose and be outraged by the failed drug war. We need to step up our efforts, grow our numbers, and continue to win hearts and minds because the casualties from the war continue to grow every day. And the war on drugs is not going to end itself."

    By Tony Newman

  • gayle_woods, August 13, 2014 1:28PM

    "I've come to realize that Bruno has some deeper rooted issues on the so called "War on Drugs". . In any event making another type drug legal in a thinly veiled attempt of comparison to smoking and alcohol consumption just doesn't seem to make any sense."

    And what's the deeper rooted issues that you are talking about?  It is a matter of insanity and hypocrisy.  Have you also come to realize that your deeply rooted biases are showing?

    Why don't you skip the useless amature psychoanalysis attempts (you aren't any good at it anyway) and tell me what I have said that is incorrect and why?

     

  • I've come to realize that Bruno has some deeper rooted issues on the so called "War on Drugs". . In any event making another type drug legal in a thinly veiled attempt of comparison to smoking and alcohol consumption just doesn't seem to make any sense.

  • BrunoUno - there's no justification in saying that wine and cocaine or heroin are basically the same, when you know darn well they are not.  I know of no one that has died from one glass of wine; however, there are plenty who have died from one snort of cocaine, one injection of heroin.  Your arguments simply are not reasonable.

    Secondly, the sheriff and the prosecutor are not ILLEGALLY preparing to prosecute someone for having marijuana in their home.  They are LEGALLY prosecuting someone for BREAKING THE LAW, which is selling drugs that are deemed illegal at the time of this arrest.

    You can go suspend your value judgements - as you call them; however, the law IS still THE LAW, regardless of your own world view.

    Secondly, there have been many studies on these various drugs - and though I do not dispute the effects of medicinal marijuana in assisting in reducing nausea from chemotherapy and other uses such as helping with glaucoma, I still do not think this is a drug that should be sold for recreational use.

    I do believe in medicinal marijuana, but this is not what this gentleman's operation was about.


  • We simply must suspend our value judgments about kinds of drugs and admit (however painful it might be) that a glass of beer on a hot afternoon and the bottle of wine with a fine meal are no different in kind from the joint of marijuana or snort of cocaine; nor is the evening devoted to cocktails essentially different from one devoted to heroin.  All are examples of the same phenomenon: the use of chemical agents to induce alterations in consciousness.  

    Your value judgments are of no value in determining what is going on in America.  We are spending far too much time, energy and MONEY on trying to find out why people take drugs, but in fact, what we are doing is trying to find out why some people are taking some drugs that we disapprove of.  No useful answers can come out of that sort of inquiry as the question is improperly phrased.

    As we write the Sheriff and Prosecutor are llegally prepping to prosecute this man and incarcerate him for years in the pen for possessing marijuana in his own home.  What if marijuana does indeed cure cancer?  What kind of society does this to its citizens?  What kind of people are we to stand by and allow it.  You don't have to go along with this witch hunt, ya' know.

    Jury nullification occurs in a trial when a jury acquits a defendant they believe to be guilty of the charges against them. This may occur when members of the jury disagree with the law the defendant has been charged with breaking, or believe that the law should not be applied in that particular case.

    Jury nullification is a de facto power of juries. Judges rarely inform juries of their nullification power. The power of jury nullification derives from an inherent quality of most modern common law systems—a general unwillingness to inquire into jurors' motivations during or after deliberations. A jury's ability to nullify the law is further supported by two common law precedents: the prohibition on punishing jury members for their verdict, and the prohibition on retrying defendants after an acquittal (see related topics res judicata and double jeopardy).
    Jury nullification is an important safeguard of last resort against wrongful imprisonment and government tyranny.  The War on Some Drugs That Aren't Alcohol and Tobacco is a classic example of wrongful imprisonment and government tyranny! 

    Rise up!!!
     

  • Let me clarify this question a bit more: Who will be the last person to go to prison and have their life destroyed for no good reasons in this senseless war on some drugs?

  • gayle_woods, August 12, 2014 10:41AM

    "Bruno ask:

    "Who will be the last person to go to prison and have their life destroyed in this senseless war on some drugs?"

    "Most likely some of the same ones that get drunk and drive, get arrested, go to court and take their punishment like everybody else. The same ones that furnish alcohol to minors, get caught go to court and take their punishment like the rest. Why should this guy be any different? He made a choice to break the law and now has to live with the consequences."

    I beg to differ as your comparisons are illogical and totally biased against marijuana simply because it is still illegal here in KY!  Possessing marijuana (or even selling it to adults) is a victimless crime that hurts no one!  Never has, never will, which is why it now is legal in 2 states and decriminalized in 22 others.  This situation is entirely different than DUI where you are actually endangering the very lives of innocent folks who are on the public highways.  The same goes for furnishing alcohol to minors fer crissakes!  Really, you are actually trying to make that comparison?  Really?  Why not just throw in raping little boys while you are at it?

    This guy IS different because what he did was waayyy different and much less harmful to society or the individuals involved.  The worst thing about marijuana is that it is ILLEGAL, not because of some health related issues that it may cause.  It is non-toxic, which means there is no lethal dose. It does not cause disease.

    g_w: "Maybe he was GREAT with kids and could really relate to them because he himself has not matured to the point to know the difference between right and wrong."

    I had a judge tell me a long time ago when I was questioning the unfairness of one of his rulings that what is right is not the same as what is legal, and the converse is also true...what is wrong is not the same as illegal. When it comes to marijuana laws in KY, it has been illegal for a long time but is the law right?  Not according to the science and the facts.  There was a time when the law said that black people were slaves and women were property.  Was the law right?  Not hardly, and it took the Civil War to do what was legal but very wrong indeed.

    Knowing the difference between "right and wrong" is not the same thing as knowing the difference between legal and illegal. Quite the contrary!

    I ask again, "Who will be the last person to go to prison and have their life destroyed in this senseless war on some drugs?" 

  • Yes the law is the law. Understood. He might have broken the law.... and have to take responsibility of his actions. But he's still a good Man. Yea....he probabily made poor discisions like we all do sometimes and Im sure others have skeletons too but have yet been exposed... Take a moment and look at your life and discern the areas that need fixing....But guess what GOD still LOVES and forgives him!!!!!! and you too. take a moment and pray for the guy instead of bashing people. Thats the best thing to do.

    Peace!!!!!

  • BrunoUno - and the others who defer to him (if they're not just the same person posting under various email addresses):  

    You have to actually change the law for something that is considered illegal to become LEGAL.  Until that is done, your opinion on whether something is or isn't legal doesn't matter.  It's still against the law to possess or traffic in illegal substances.

    Some people think it's o.k. to steal/shoplift from big box stores because they feel as though they're entitled (and that the big box stores can afford the loss.)  Does that make it any less of a crime, just because of their opinion?

    Some people think it's o.k. to beat their kids - because the kids are theirs and they think their kids should learn some discipline.  There's a law against that, too.  Does it make it any less illegal because of their opinions?

    Some people believe in the Old Testament - "an eye for an eye," and think they should be able to exact mob justice on a suspect.  Just because of their beliefs, does that make it legal to hunt down and kill someone you believe has wronged you?

    So, in other words, your opinions on the legality of drug busts don't really matter until you can transform your opinions into a bill that is reasonable to pass both chambers of the Kentucky legislature and garner the signature of the governor.

    Until that happens - it's still against the law to traffic in and possess illegal drugs.

  • Bruno ask:

    "Who will be the last person to go to prison and have their life destroyed in this senseless war on some drugs?"

    Most likely some of the same ones that get drunk and drive, get arrested, go to court and take their punishment like everybody else. The same ones that furnish alcohol to minors, get caught go to court and take their punishment like the rest. Why should this guy be any different? He made a choice to break the law and now has to live with the consequences.

    Maybe he was GREAT with kids and could really relate to them because he himself has not matured to the point to know the difference between right and wrong.

  • Article says the man charged with "trafficking" pot - one moral of this story is not to share your pot with others.  He may have been providing pot to cancer patients or other critically ill people to help relieve their discomfort and stress.  We'll never know because all these marijuana "busts" are painted with same broad brush as other very harmful pharmaceutical and manufactured drugs.  However if this man or another person drives drunk - jeopardizing the innocent motoring public - they get a slap on the wrist, amended/abated sentence and are let back out to drink and drive again.  The situation with pot busts and drunk driving is not balanced!
     

  • I know people who think very highly of him, even after this came out.

  • ffort2013, August 11, 2014 8:37PM

    "He doesn't have any business working with the kids anymore..."

    It seems that your statement smacks of the propaganda of drug war bias where hysteria trumps logic and reason.  Why does Miles have "no business working with kids anymore"?  He wasn't accused of or actually doing anything illegal or even questionable with them or any minor.  From what I could tell he was GREAT with kids and could really relate to them and inspire them to achieve.  What exactly disqualifies him from coaching football?  

    Football coaches are notorious for their bad habits like chewing tobacco (tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death) or smoking it, drinking alcohol, (the 3rd leading cause of preventable death) and eating bad food and becoming obese (2nd leading cause of prevetnable death).  Marijuana has never caused a death in recorded history.  Why should we disqualify Miles because he was involved with a drug that is safer than bottled water and not for these other very unhealthy lifestyle choices?  Where is the largest threat to our children?

    Marijuana is the third most popular recreational drug in America (behind only alcohol and tobacco), and has been used by nearly 100 million Americans. According to government surveys, some 25 million Americans have smoked marijuana in the past year, and more than 14 million do so regularly despite harsh laws against its use. And yet, nobody has ever died from using it, or for that matter become ill, as it is non-toxic.  Our public policies should reflect this reality, not deny it.

  • He doesn't have any business working with the kids anymore BUT if they are firing him they should fire other staff members for illegal activity.

  • The State Journal could not confirm whether Miles is an assistant coach for the upcoming season.

    Um, if I had to venture to guess, I'd say that Mr. Miles is now gainfully unemployed and shall remain so for the forseeable future.  And all for what?  Weed!  Pot! Mary Jane!  Grass!  It all means the same thing...you smoke it and you get high. Barney called it happy weed on Andy Griffith. And it is completely legal in 2 states and decriminalized in 22 others.  

    Who will be the last person to go to prison and have their life destroyed in this senseless war on some drugs?