Here and There

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Frankfort & nearby

Frankfort Regional Medical  Center is hosting two shopping events, the proceeds from which will benefit local charities.

On Dec. 14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. a “Holly Days Bazaar” will be held in the  second floor conference room of the Medical Pavilion.  Items to be sold include candles, crafts, baskets, decorations and much more. 

On Dec. 17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., a “Books are Fun” sale will be held in Conference Room C of the Medical Pavilion.  Tons of children’s books and toys and a wide variety of specialty books and gifts. 

Liberty Hall

Liberty Hall Historic Site includes Liberty Hall and the Orlando Brown House, both located on Wilkinson Street. The houses are open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Tours of Liberty Hall start at noon, 1:30, and 3, leaving from the Orlando Brown House. Admission to the Orlando Brown House is free; there is a small charge for tours of Liberty Hall. To register or find more information about programs and exhibits, go to libertyhall.org or call 227-2560.

On exhibit through Dec. 15 at the Orlando Brown House: “What’s Your Story? Favorite Children’s Books.” LHHS’s holiday exhibit features favorite children’s books on loan to us from members of the community.

Historical Society

Here are on-going exhibits now open at the Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, Broadway and Ann Streets. The KHS campus begins its winter schedule Sunday, continuing through March 9. For more information about the winter schedule, visit the website, www.history.ky.gov, or call 564-1792.

Civil War: My Brother, My Enemy runs through Saturday in the Keeneland Changing Exhibits Gallery.

A Kentucky Journey in the Warren and Betty Rosenthal Permanent Exhibits Gallery. Artifacts and images, along with hands-on activities, tell the exciting story of Kentucky’s history over time. Journey through Kentucky’s past and witness the experiences of those who have called Kentucky home.

Toyota Kentucky Hall of Governors: For more than 100 years, KHS has had the distinct privilege of displaying and conserving Kentucky’s governors’ official portraits. Commissioned while governors are in office and hung at the end of their terms, these works of art represent both the person who held office and the political climate during his or her term.

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