You Asked: Will the state pay to have roads repaired once the Capital Plaza redevelopment is completed?

It is no secret that Frankfort’s infrastructure is being overburdened by the heavy machinery lugging equipment and materials to and from the construction site of a new state office building downtown. Among the roads that are pocked with potholes are East Main Street (U.S. 60), from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to the Capital Avenue Bridge, […]

It is no secret that Frankfort’s infrastructure is being overburdened by the heavy machinery lugging equipment and materials to and from the construction site of a new state office building downtown.

Among the roads that are pocked with potholes are East Main Street (U.S. 60), from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to the Capital Avenue Bridge, and Wilkinson Boulevard (U.S. 127), near the construction entrance.

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) Division of Maintenance will evaluate the routes for resurfacing every three years, like it does for all state roads classified as major public routes, said KYTC District 5 spokeswoman Andrea Clifford.

“The engineers look at rideability, cracking and rutting,” she said. “They rank sections on a point system and make recommendations on the worst sections in our district that need to be paved.”

Staff members then prepare detailed cost estimates, as they are provided with a limited amount of funds for resurfacing.

In District 5, which includes Franklin, Bullitt, Henry, Jefferson, Oldham, Shelby, Spencer and Trimble counties, resurfacing funds cover the cost of repaving 20 to 25 routes each year, depending on length of the section and the number of lanes, Clifford added.

Wilkinson Boulevard underwent a complete concrete replacement between West Broadway and Holmes Street in 2014 and should be in good condition, according to Clifford.

The district’s maintenance staff evaluates all rural secondary routes each year, then makes recommendations to each county on how to use limited funding.

“Those funds must first go toward maintenance, such as pothole patching, ditching and snow removal,” Clifford told The State Journal. “Remaining money is used for resurfacing projects and slide repairs.”

In the meantime, district maintenance staff will perform pothole patching. Residents are urged to notify KYTC of specific areas where potholes have formed. A form to report potholes is available at https://bpm.kytc.ky.gov/ApplicationBuilder/eFormRender.html?code=810A005056A2147711773A3B03F6EFEF&Process=PA-DV-ReportAPothole.

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